but we are actually all winds
ever more than before
even ever more than before 
gaining 
speeding 
booming
towards future 
speeding
and redeeming laughters
and happiest laughters
Start page JUMO | Code for America | good.is |
“If you want to free a society, just give them internet access. Because people, the young guys, you know, are all going to go out and see biased media, see the truth about other nations and their own nation and they’re going to be able to contribute and collaborate together.”

okayla:

My mom is watching Game of Thrones and she just said in the saddest voice, “Poor Salsa” and doesn’t get why I keep laughing.

Source: okayla
September 30, 2014, 8:05am   56,600 notes
vintagemickeymouse:

Fantasia, The Pastoral Symphony (1940)

vintagemickeymouse:

Fantasia, The Pastoral Symphony (1940)

dior:

DIOR READY-TO-WEAR SPRING-SUMMER 2015 COLLECTION
Gif by Rosanna Webster

dior:

DIOR READY-TO-WEAR SPRING-SUMMER 2015 COLLECTION

Gif by Rosanna Webster

20aliens:

These icebergs by Zaria Forman are not photographed, they are painted. The New York based artist paints fascinating landscapes using pastels. The inspiration for her drawings began in her early childhood when she traveled with her family throughout several of the world’s most remote landscapes, which were the subject of her mother’s fine art photography. When Zaria Forman visited Greenland in 2012, she saw firsthand the effects that climate change had taken on the region. In her project ‘Chasing the Light’ she captures the idea of a world deep in the process of a terrifying change.

The artist explains: ‘My mother, Rena Bass Forman, had conceived the idea for the voyage, but sadly did not live to see it through. During the months of her illness her dedication to the expedition never wavered and I promised to carry out her final journey. In Greenland, I scattered her ashes amongst crackling ice diamonds, on the towering peak of one of earth’s oldest stones and under the green glow of northern lights. She is now a part of the landscape she loved so much. I am deeply grateful for the team of talented artists and scholars and the Wanderbird captains and crew for helping me carry out her wishes and realize her dream.’

dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.

Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.

The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.

Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.

However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.

This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.

Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.

See an extended gallery.

(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

doomdoesashepleases:

The legend of Zelda: Minish Cap by Enigmasystem
saradrawsdaily:

A black cat in a pumpkin!

saradrawsdaily:

A black cat in a pumpkin!

afuchan:

Vagabonds
I’ve been busy with work and I barely have time to squeeze in something I want to do for myself. It’s refreshing.

afuchan:

Vagabonds

I’ve been busy with work and I barely have time to squeeze in something I want to do for myself. It’s refreshing.

A broken tumblr tale

9940km:

I thought
we were friends
but then
you unfollowed
me

*unfollows back*
Source: 9940km
September 29, 2014, 4:16pm   24 notes

ladydragon76:

quantumfemme:

babygoatsandfriends:

The mythical goaticorn

Via brokenshovels and eltfarms

dear god

And now I know what to do to my cat for Halloween