but we are actually all winds
ever more than before
even ever more than before 
gaining 
speeding 
booming
towards future 
speeding
and redeeming laughters
and happiest laughters
Start page JUMO | Code for America | good.is |
“If you want to free a society, just give them internet access. Because people, the young guys, you know, are all going to go out and see biased media, see the truth about other nations and their own nation and they’re going to be able to contribute and collaborate together.”

All right, a bit of honesty here. We all talk about how we’re worried Egypt is going to fail economically and politically, but to me - 
- the real danger Egypt is facing is the fact that a high percentage of its youth have become largely disillusioned and detached. We -
- or the majority at least, don’t care anymore, and the underprivileged couldn’t care less either. So, we’re arriving at a point where - 
- no one at all will be even worried about this place, and that scares me. It scares me a lot.
Mohamed Samir @Mazloum

All right, a bit of honesty here. We all talk about how we’re worried Egypt is going to fail economically and politically, but to me - 

- the real danger Egypt is facing is the fact that a high percentage of its youth have become largely disillusioned and detached. We -

- or the majority at least, don’t care anymore, and the underprivileged couldn’t care less either. So, we’re arriving at a point where - 

- no one at all will be even worried about this place, and that scares me. It scares me a lot.

Mohamed Samir @Mazloum

▸ [Syria, Chemical Weapon] British scientists 'find evidence of Syrian chemical attack', Telegraph UK

Traces of sarin nerve agent - Times say. 

A secret British operation has smuggled out a soil sample which provides the first forensic evidence of the use of chemical weapons in Syria, it was reported last night.

Government scientists working at the Ministry of Defence’s research facility at Porton Down, Wiltshere, found traces of “some kind of chemical weapon” after performing tests, according to The Times.

The tests at Porton Down reportedly concluded that the chemical traces were from a weapon rather than gas sometimes used by the Syrian security forces to put down protests.

"There have been some reports that it was just a strong riot-control agent but that is not the case - it’s something else although it can’t definitively be said to be sarin nerve agent," one source told the newspaper.

The sample was reportedly smuggled out of Syria in a mission involving MI6 last month.

It was not clear whether the sample was from Aleppo, Syria’s largest city, where more than 20 people were alleged to have been killed in a chemical attack last month.

Both the Syrian regime and rebel groups accused the other side of using chemical weapons but definitive evidence has not yet emerged to support either claim, or even to prove that chemical weapons were used at all.

The Ministry of Defence declined to comment on the reported tests at Porton Down.



Apr 12, 2013, 7:29pm  0 notes      

▸ [Egypt Muslim Brotherhood Supreme Guide, Mohamed Badie] Ahram Online, Egypt

On Saturday, two passengers on Cairo’s underground metro in their early 20s looked jaded, but they still shouted at the top of their voices, demanding an end to the “rule of the Supreme Guide.”

Calling him names, the two men went on a foul-mouthed outburst against Mohamed Badie, the man they believe had overruled Egypt’s elected President Mohamed Morsi and assumed effective control of the country.

The passengers, it transpired, were angry because they had been involved in a confrontation with Brotherhood members in front of the Islamist group’s headquarters in the Cairo district of Mokattam, a fortress that has long been spared street violence and attacks.

The presidential palace was a protest hotspot for several months, but it has now made way for the Brotherhood’s Cairo headquarters, a building that lies on a hill which overlooks many parts of Cairo, in a reflection of the opposition’s belief that Morsi is largely subordinate to Brotherhood leader Badie, who keeps a low profile despite being the subject of constant speculation about his actual role in Egypt.

[…]

Perhaps Badie has something to prove to some disgruntled political activists, who seem to have almost forgotten Morsi in their chants, preferring to hurl a barrage of insults at a man they believe is more influential in the unofficial ruling hierarchy.



Source: english.ahram.org.eg

Mar 18, 2013, 3:53pm  0 notes      

 
“"Egypt is reliant on the Gulf now for much-needed financial and economic assistance," says Hanna, of the Century Foundation. "And I think their views, which are obviously quite hostile to Iran, will be an important factor for Egypt’s new rulers in terms of thinking about how they’re going to reestablish ties with Iran."

Despite the criticism, senior members of Egypt’s powerful Muslim Brotherhood said that forging a relationship with Iran is in the interests of Egypt and the region, even if the countries have their differences.”

February 06, 2013, 5:55pm  2 notes

▸ [Egypt, Islam] Al-Azhar unveils 10-point initiative to end Egypt's political crisis - Ahram Online

"The aim of this meeting is not political, but rather to launch an initiative to stop the violence. It’s a moral initiative aimed at stopping the bloodshed. That is why Egyptian youth called on Al-Azhar to hold this meeting and gather together all Egypt’s political forces and parties," Ghoneim, a prominent activist, declared at a press conference held after the meeting.

It was not Al-Azhar’s first political initiative. Last year, the famous religious institute presented a similar initiative aimed at resolving the crisis over the drafting of Egypt’s new constitution.

ElBaradei, Fotouh, etc - most big names attended. Looking at Twitterverse atm doesn’t seem people are really taking it seriously. RTBS.



Jan 31, 2013, 10:15pm  1 note      

▸ [Egypt] Chaos and Lawlessness Grow After Days of Unrest in Egypt, NYTimes

Bit long and complicated but a good capture: As some/few protesters armed - Brotherhood-police-military dynamics. (Brotherhood and police is hated. Then how military will act.)

In a departure from most previous clashes around the Egyptian revolution, in Port Said the police also faced armed assailants. Two were seen with handguns on Monday around a siege of a police station, in addition to the man with the Kalashnikov.

Earlier, a man accosted an Egyptian journalist working for The New York Times. “If I see you taking pictures of protesters with weapons, I will kill you,” he warned.

Defending their stations, the police fought back, and in Cairo they battled their own commander, the interior minister.

Brotherhood leaders say Mr. Morsi has been afraid to name an outsider as minister for fear of a police revolt, putting off any meaningful reform of the Mubarak security services. But when Mr. Morsi recently tapped a veteran ministry official, Mohamed Ibrahim, for the job, many in the security services complained that even the appointment of one insider to replace another was undue interference.

In a measure of the low level of the new government’s top-down control over the security forces, officers even cursed and chased away their new interior minister when he tried to attend a funeral on Friday for two members of the security forces killed in the recent clashes.

“What do you mean we won’t be armed? We would be disarmed to die,” one shouted, on a video recording of the event.

In an attempt to placate the rank and file, Mr. Ibrahim issued a statement to police personnel sympathizing with the pressure the protests put on them. Later, he promised them sophisticated weapons.

“That can only be a recipe for future bloodshed,” said Hossam Bahgat, executive director of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, which monitors police abuses.

By turning to the military, Mr. Morsi signaled that he understood he could not rely on the police to pacify the streets, Mr. Bahgat argued.

But it was far from clear that Mr. Morsi was fully in command of the military either. The new Islamist-backed Constitution grants the general broad autonomy within the Egyptian government in an apparent quid pro quo for turning over full power to President Morsi in August. Mr. Morsi’s formal request for the military to restore order was “not so much an instruction as a plea for support,” Mr. Bahgat said.

It remains to be seen whether the military retains the credibility to quell the protests. The soldiers stationed in Port Said did nothing to intervene as clashes raged on in the streets hours after curfew Monday night.

Analysts close to the military say its officers are extremely reluctant to engage in the kind of harsh crackdown that would damage its reputation with Egyptians, preferring to rely on its presence alone.

Near the front lines of the clashes, residents debated whether they would welcome a military takeover. “The military that was sent to Port Said is the Muslim Brotherhood’s military,” said one man, dismissing its independence from Mr. Morsi.

But others said they still had faith in the institution, if not in its top generals. “In the military, the soldiers are our brothers,” said Khaled Samir Abdullah, 25. Pointing to the police, he said, “those ones are merciless.”



Source: The New York Times

Jan 29, 2013, 8:12pm  0 notes      

▸ [Egypt] Egypt defense chief warns political unrest could bring about “collapse” of the state - Bloomberg

The conflict between the political forces “and their disagreement on running the country may lead to the collapse of the state,” Defense Minister Abdelfatah Al-Seesi was quoted as saying in a statement posted on the armed forces’ official Facebook page. The political instability and economic challenges “represent a real threat to Egypt’s security.”

Many experts saying still it’s hard to say how this is going to be resolved. Military take over and/or some kind of national reconciliation/salvation government. But how anyone can change Brotherhood’s perspective/entire psychology - that they don’t have - unilateral legitimacy over everyone else. Or talk to ‘within’ and manufacture the way it might be able to come down from the tree. 



Jan 29, 2013, 8:01pm  0 notes      

And the significance and prospect of Union coming in:

January 28, 2013, 10:51pm   0 notes

Today Port Said.

Source: twitter.com
January 28, 2013, 7:12pm   0 notes
 
“However, the opposition are not saints; they share a huge share of the blame. They are fully aware of the problem and the violence that became a prevailing theme in most demonstrations these days, yet they offer no clear plan or alternative. They desire to show their strength, overriding their critical thinking abilities. In fact, I think they partly considered violence as desirable in order to expose the weakness of the government.

In Egypt, proactivity is an alien concept that has been neither used nor appreciated. We love our knee-jerk reaction, as if we want to negate thousands of years of frustration as a result of oppression and submission. Violence became addictive, an easy way to prove our relevance and satisfy our egos through our angry youth.

Yes, our youth are angry. They are the kids we didn’t raise, the students we never teach, and the citizens we like to abuse to reach power.”

Egyptian Aak: Week 4, Nervana Mahmoud

Pretty tense description. But wish there were other real voices to this issue. (There gotta be other accounts.) 

Thing is there is no sense of urgency or proactivity among experts on Egypt (like, some of them are actually Egyptians but -…) It’s a mystery. 

January 27, 2013, 8:46pm  1 note

UPDATE 1-Egyptian pound falls on devaluation talk (Reuters) [*confusing about whether Egypt’s central bank has recourses or not.]
* Pound falls to 6.175/dlr, a near 8-year low
* Trading volume heavy; signs central bank selling dollars
* Analyst see rush for dollars lowering Dec FX reserve figure
* Analysts say c.bank’s policy options limited




“Definitely there is pressure on the pound,” said a dealer at a second bank. “If foreign reserves are much lower at the end of the month the central bank will have to lower the pound.”
http://english.alarabiya.net/articles/2012/12/27/257349.html
  • UPDATE 1-Egyptian pound falls on devaluation talk (Reuters) [*confusing about whether Egypt’s central bank has recourses or not.]
  • * Pound falls to 6.175/dlr, a near 8-year low
  • * Trading volume heavy; signs central bank selling dollars
  • * Analyst see rush for dollars lowering Dec FX reserve figure
  • * Analysts say c.bank’s policy options limited

“Definitely there is pressure on the pound,” said a dealer at a second bank. “If foreign reserves are much lower at the end of the month the central bank will have to lower the pound.”

http://english.alarabiya.net/articles/2012/12/27/257349.html

 
“Islamists in the region await the outcome in Syria. They do not wish to bite off more than they can chew. If patience is the Islamist first principle, consolidation of gains is the second. Should Syria fall, Jordan could be next.”

This Is Not A Revolution, Hussein Agha and Robert Malley

I do hate, detest - the tone this piece is written with.

But - well, I just should find the paper handling the same content with much more regular IR expressions. 

Gotta be around already. 

December 10, 2012, 6:11pm  0 notes



"According to the FSA commander, Abu Hilal was an infamous member of the shabiha in Aleppo — ghosts in Arabic, the term given to Assad’s paramilitary forces. The rebels claimed that Hilal was notorious in Aleppo, claiming he’d murdered or assisted in the killing of six people and raping a female student at Aleppo’s university. I wanted to ask Hilal about this at the time, but he was so mentally damaged from torture that you could have told him the sky was yellow and he would have agreed. I made this picture as he began to cower when more rebels piled into the room to view their prize: a member of the regime’s hated shabiha. Later in the night, I was kicked awake and told to come outside. In the back of the dark compound, I saw a large flatbed truck. As I looked closer, I realized it was a massive truck bomb — maybe 400 kg or more, covered with recently clipped pine branches. I pondered the operation and couldn’t figure out how they were going to get the truck to their target, one of the last Syrian army checkpoints north of Aleppo. I suddenly realized the rebels’ plan — to make Hilal drive the truck to the checkpoint after convincing him he was going to be traded in a prisoner exchange. I have seen numerous people die in battle, in hospitals from wounds in combat. It can be sad and traumatic, but there is a certain contract that fighters understand in battle — you kill or be killed. For me, though, this was different. I was watching a premeditated murder by rebels I shared food with and laughed with. They were not Islamist boogeymen. They were real estate agents, accountants, students, defected soldiers and nurses. And now they were deceiving and murdering a man who had already surrendered. The rebels later returned to the compound with downcast eyes. The bomb had failed to detonate remotely and Assad’s forces had captured Hilal. I have never heard any accounts of what happened to him, though I imagine showing up to a regime checkpoint with a giant bomb is probably a surefire way to get executed. I am reminded by this about the nature of war — it’s ability to make decent people with a noble and just cause capable of absolutely terrible things, mutating them through pain and desperation.”
— Bryan Denton


But then, actual pushers, planners, architects of this war - is seeing further away.
In a way, beyond Syria.  
Thing is - the current world has no intellect or thought corresponding to that. 
I am kind of doubting it will. (I know few or some got it. Thinking about further from further away. As ‘Strategist’ - and few some others - as peacemaker.) 
But will see. 

"According to the FSA commander, Abu Hilal was an infamous member of the shabiha in Aleppo — ghosts in Arabic, the term given to Assad’s paramilitary forces. The rebels claimed that Hilal was notorious in Aleppo, claiming he’d murdered or assisted in the killing of six people and raping a female student at Aleppo’s university. I wanted to ask Hilal about this at the time, but he was so mentally damaged from torture that you could have told him the sky was yellow and he would have agreed. I made this picture as he began to cower when more rebels piled into the room to view their prize: a member of the regime’s hated shabiha

Later in the night, I was kicked awake and told to come outside. In the back of the dark compound, I saw a large flatbed truck. As I looked closer, I realized it was a massive truck bomb — maybe 400 kg or more, covered with recently clipped pine branches. I pondered the operation and couldn’t figure out how they were going to get the truck to their target, one of the last Syrian army checkpoints north of Aleppo. I suddenly realized the rebels’ plan — to make Hilal drive the truck to the checkpoint after convincing him he was going to be traded in a prisoner exchange. 

I have seen numerous people die in battle, in hospitals from wounds in combat. It can be sad and traumatic, but there is a certain contract that fighters understand in battle — you kill or be killed. For me, though, this was different. I was watching a premeditated murder by rebels I shared food with and laughed with. They were not Islamist boogeymen. They were real estate agents, accountants, students, defected soldiers and nurses. And now they were deceiving and murdering a man who had already surrendered. 

The rebels later returned to the compound with downcast eyes. The bomb had failed to detonate remotely and Assad’s forces had captured Hilal. I have never heard any accounts of what happened to him, though I imagine showing up to a regime checkpoint with a giant bomb is probably a surefire way to get executed. I am reminded by this about the nature of war — it’s ability to make decent people with a noble and just cause capable of absolutely terrible things, mutating them through pain and desperation.”

— Bryan Denton

But then, actual pushers, planners, architects of this war - is seeing further away.

In a way, beyond Syria.  

Thing is - the current world has no intellect or thought corresponding to that. 

I am kind of doubting it will. (I know few or some got it. Thinking about further from further away. As ‘Strategist’ - and few some others - as peacemaker.) 

But will see. 

 
“If someone from the U.S. government with expertise could go there and help guide the newly voted cabinet, Morsy would understand that a democracy is reliant upon that face that there is no “i” in “team.” Basically, a democracy runs by the voice and needs of the crowd not the pockets and selfishness of those standing at the podium.”
A Discussion on Political Issues in Modern Egypt, Ranna Abedal Raheem (glitter-maharani.tumblr.com)

December 09, 2012, 2:21pm  1 note

 
“The MB need to recall, for example, that many of those who protest against Mr Morsi today, are the same people who defended the MB when they were in jails under Mubarak. More radical supporters of the opposition also need to recognise that while the MB are their political adversaries, they are an integral part of the Egyptian political arena, and must be viewed as such.

Diminishing the levels of polarisation is not an easy task – and it looks as though Egypt will have to engage in years of repair to its political discourse. But the time for beginning that process must be forged in a moment of fire, like the one Egypt is undergoing at present. Egyptians must remember Egypt is big enough for all of them – and that is why the revolution began on the 25th of January 2011. Anything else is a betrayal of those 18 days.”
The irony in Egypt’s political crisis - H.A. Hellyer, Ahram Online

December 09, 2012, 2:09pm  0 notes