but we are actually all winds
ever more than before
even ever more than before 
gaining 
speeding 
booming
towards future 
speeding
and redeeming laughters
and happiest laughters
Start page JUMO | Code for America | good.is |
“If you want to free a society, just give them internet access. Because people, the young guys, you know, are all going to go out and see biased media, see the truth about other nations and their own nation and they’re going to be able to contribute and collaborate together.”

Alright have to log this

Why no mentions or concern about civilian casualties in this Damascus capital - ongoing battle? By media, experts, outside government officials, diplomats. Some tweets and tumblr posts I saw mentioning this because there are people who actually have their families, relatives and friends trapped in this situation. 

There were few reports mentioning that some civilian populations were escaping the area battles are taking place - but journalists etc should be able to, or just should extend their paragraphs to mention about the situations of civilians sandwiched by the regime force and FSA. 

It’s been quite paralyzing not seeing that part of thinking. 

July 17, 2012, 3:57pm   1 note
▸ [With Video Cameras and SNS, Palestinian Citizen Journalism Taking Place Across West Bank] Noah Browning, Reuters

Teacher Ibrahim Makhlouf, who filmed the incident, lives by the brush scorched in the clashes on the village’s edge, beneath the gaze of the prefabricated suburbs of Yitzhar, which lie outside the official settlement boundary.

"We want the whole world to see what Israel and the settlers do to us. They steal our land and they attack us, and the world said we were the terrorists and criminals,” he said.

"Now we can make it clear who’s the aggressor and who’s attacking whom. The truth contradicts their claims about our situation."

The Israeli Defence Force has ordered an investigation and confirmed that live fire was used during the confrontation. “That said, it appears that the video in question does not reflect the incident in its entirety,” it said in a statement.

A spokesman for the settlers said the violence flared when they were pelted with stones as they tried to put out a scrub fire allegedly started by the Palestinians.

B’Tselem, an Israeli human rights organization, provided the cameras used to document the event, as part of a program started in 2007 whereby it has distributed around 150 camcorders to “citizen journalists” throughout the West Bank.

The group aims to use social media to bring alleged violations by settlers and the military into public view.

"The importance of our work is that we show what is being done in (Israel’s) name in the West Bank by our soldiers and by organs of our government," said Sarit Michaeli, B’Tselem’s spokesperson.

"The media might just show one minute, but anyone who’s interested can watch this whole playlist and make up their own mind," she said, referring to numerous videos showing the shootings uploaded to YouTube.

[…]

Circulated among army personnel, an internal memorandum obtained by Israeli newspaper Yedioth Ahronoth in the wake of the Eisner affair underscored mounting concern by the Israeli leadership over the influence of video on the media narrative.

"Remember it takes only 10 seconds out of hours of video footage to cause irreparable damage to the image of the soldiers, the army and the state," the memo said.

"The media does not reflect reality as a mirror, but rather shapes and influences it. The Palestinians make good use of this tool. It’s important to be the one leading and not the one being led," it continued, reflecting the fact that Israeli soldiers now often film incidents of unrest in order to advance their version of events.

IDF officers say their primary task in the West Bank is to defend settlers from Palestinian attacks.

In villages and at demonstrations throughout the West Bank, cameras now accompany stones and tear gas as an increasingly permanent fixture.

"Our impact is excellent if you consider that Nabi Saleh is a village of less than 600 people,” said Bilal Tamimi, an activist and wielder of a B’Tselem camera from a flashpoint area near an Israeli settlement and military base in the West Bank.

"People from around the world have learned what happens here through this distinct medium," he said.



May 24, 2012, 2:36am  1 note      

▸ http://theatlantic.tumblr.com/post/21786988916/robert-wright-on-newsweek-and-foreign-policy

theatlantic:

Robert Wright on Newsweek and Foreign Policy

Actually, the only clash here is over which part of the woman should be covered in black and which part should be exposed—and on this issue the two magazines are completely at odds. They are in broad agreement about how to get people to pay attention to your magazine.

I wonder how these covers affect how the cover stories—Newsweek’s by Katie Roiphe and FP’s by Mona Eltahawy—are being received. Eltahawy’s is a particularly interesting case. Her piece is a passionate indictment of the way women are treated in Arab countries. And I would imagine that some of the people in those countries who most resist her message might try to use the cover to discredit it. (Though it’s hard to tell in this thumbnail image, the woman is covered only by paint, and the lower part of her breast is visible.) Then again, there’s an Arabic edition of FP, and it wouldn’t shock me if its cover has a different look. 

[Images: Newsweek, Foreign Policy]

Yeah

I really don’t think all these

  • academic
  • quasi-academic
  • journalist

approaches can be really responsible for these actually serious issues. There can be much more simple and transparent - and responsible ways to represent problems, voices, and also display solutions-at-work. 

And Robert Wright and Atlantic is taking a cheap shot on this. 

Under ‘Entertainment’ directory/classification.

I tend to feel there is this (strong) ‘America’ thing underlying.

Sensationalize, always talk and think and write and inform and influence from partisan stance. 

You can see it in the URL. The Atlantic’s post is under 'Entertainment' Directory.

http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/04/newsweek-fp-magazine-clash-over-editorial-philosophy/256279/



Reblogged from theatlantic.

Apr 25, 2012, 12:29pm  88 notes      

newshour:

Before His Death, Dawn Editor Razvi ‘Wouldn’t Leave Pakistan for the Moon’ By LARISA EPATKO
“I have lived in several countries and felt at home; ditto for my wife,” Murtaza Razvi wrote in an email to the NewsHour just two days before his brutal death. “But we’re raising our three daughters in Pakistan because if people like us left, we felt we’d be abandoning this country to the forces of darkness.
“We wouldn’t leave Pakistan for the moon, just yet. We holiday abroad to show the girls what the ‘normal’ world is like, and that we too should be like them. Of course, the girls will make their own choices when they grow up.”
On Thursday, Razvi, the editor of the magazine section of Dawn Media Group in Karachi, was found in an office apartment building, apparently strangled to death. His death — though not connected at this point to his journalism — still serves as a reminder of the perils journalists face in the bustling port city of Karachi and elsewhere in Pakistan.
The Committee to Protect Journalists, which tracks journalism deaths around the world, ranked Pakistan as having the highest number in 2011 at seven. In 2012, it had eight. Journalists’ deaths where the motivation is connected to their work have been on the rise since 1992, the group has reported.
(Photo by Ann Hartman/East-West Center)

newshour:

Before His Death, Dawn Editor Razvi ‘Wouldn’t Leave Pakistan for the Moon’ By LARISA EPATKO

“I have lived in several countries and felt at home; ditto for my wife,” Murtaza Razvi wrote in an email to the NewsHour just two days before his brutal death. “But we’re raising our three daughters in Pakistan because if people like us left, we felt we’d be abandoning this country to the forces of darkness.

“We wouldn’t leave Pakistan for the moon, just yet. We holiday abroad to show the girls what the ‘normal’ world is like, and that we too should be like them. Of course, the girls will make their own choices when they grow up.”

On Thursday, Razvi, the editor of the magazine section of Dawn Media Group in Karachi, was found in an office apartment building, apparently strangled to death. His death — though not connected at this point to his journalism — still serves as a reminder of the perils journalists face in the bustling port city of Karachi and elsewhere in Pakistan.

The Committee to Protect Journalists, which tracks journalism deaths around the world, ranked Pakistan as having the highest number in 2011 at seven. In 2012, it had eight. Journalists’ deaths where the motivation is connected to their work have been on the rise since 1992, the group has reported.

(Photo by Ann Hartman/East-West Center)

mehreenkasana:

Failed states don’t hold literature festivals: Anatol Lieven

Anatol Lieven, author of “Pakistan: A Hard Country”, shares his thoughts on the recently held Karachi Literature Festival wherein he makes a point to state that Pakistan is not a failed state as many would argue because, according to Lieven - an experienced journalist and critical thinker, failed states do not hold literature festivals. An excerpt from Dawn’s video is given below:

I’m delighted to be here. What this festival demonstrates among other things […] is a wonderful range of authors in different fields. What it demonstrates, on one hand, is the tremendous richness of Pakistani culture and Pakistani literature. The enormous contribution that Pakistani makes to world literature, including, of course, English literature and scholarship. It also says something about the city. There is this line that infuriates me […] which I’ve partly written my book to argue against that “Pakistan is a failed state”, that “Pakistan is collapsing.” Well, as a journalist, I have worked in failed states, in real failed states. You did not have literature festivals in Kabul in the 1990’s or in Mogadishu today. So this festival is very positive, very enjoyable.

You can listen to more of Lieven’s thoughts by clicking on the video.

BBC Radio 4 and World Service had so many really moving and touching reports about how Pakistani people love writing, making poems, how that’s inseparable core thing for them. 

Problem is BBC really didn’t invest in keep logging those programs (I bet they must have digital copies somewhere) - so no data are available. (It’s BBC’s really wasteful approach. They make contents but they just don’t have approach about how to store them in re-usable way - for public.) 

I used to tried to catch program titles and guest speakers names - of course I don’t know how to spell down - and throw into google and tried and tried - (Sha? Shah da -? Ra or Laa? … ) to at least keep some key information about those Pakistani writers and poets. (BBC never listed those Pakistani writer/poets names on their website.) 

About faith. About how people used to stroll in town and nature. About seasons. About old Pakistan. 

I only remember how moving those little (10-15 minutes) programs were.



Reblogged from mehreenkasana.

February 18, 2012, 11:26pm  17 notes

▸ Richard Engel, NBC: NYT reporter Anthony Shadid was 'absolutely brilliant'

[…] Shadid could hear the story. 

He could feel it in the tips of his fingers.  He could do what may be impossible.  He could make war subtle.

This is what I mean.  During the often overlooked, ferociously dangerous 2006 war between Israel and Hezbollah, reporters in southern Lebanon generally rushed to the bombing sites.  The faster we got there, the fresher and more compelling our stories and pictures would be.  And there were incredibility compelling stories.  In the first three weeks of the conflict, Israel dropped as much tonnage of explosives on southern Lebanon as it used in the 1973 Mideast war. […]

Anthony covered it differently. He’d go out in the morning and find some tiny village, tucked away on a hillside, where none of us thought to go. He’d find his story in the details, not the fireballs. It takes a sensitive ear to do that. War is a loud place, full of emotions, explosions, gore, fatigue, pity, outrage and rage. But Anthony managed to pick out the quiet notes, and hear the melody playing sotto voce under the cacophony.



Feb 17, 2012, 9:12pm  7 notes      

verbalresistance:

Nuke carrier leads US strike force into Syrian waters

apofis:

Nuclear aircraft carrier USS George HW Bush has reportedly anchored off Syria. As an Arab League deadline to allow observers into the country passes with no response from Damascus, the possibility of intervention in Syria seems to be growing.

The George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group along with additional naval vessels are to remain in the Mediterranean to conducting maritime security operations and support missions as part of Operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn. The US 6th Fleet is also patrolling the area, Interfax news agency reports.

Meanwhile, America and Turkey are urging their citizens to leave Syria. The US released a statement on Wednesday urging American citizens to "depart immediately while commercial transportation is available."

Against this backdrop, the prospect of humanitarian intervention in Syria no longer looks like such an impossible scenario. And pressure is growing on the issue…

Read More: RT

The source of this news is Stratfor - only by so far: http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikkain/2011/11/24/us-government-urges-american-citizens-to-leave-syria-as-us-aircraft-carrier-approaches/

  • Also Canada keeping its patrol ship (used for Libya mission) still in Mediterranean  (said to be for emergency evacuation etc - just in case.) 

But then there are reports that Russia 

  • sending warships to Syria’s port Tartus
  • sent (sold?) hundreds of advanced anti-aircraft missiles and advisers to Syria
  • (also threatening to start targeting US missile defense system in Europe with their missiles. Another major diplomatic rift.) 
Source: apofis
November 25, 2011, 12:00pm   14 notes
yourhijabi:

indigirl1993:

theanapologist:

pulitzercenter:

Around the world, more than 51 million girls under 18 are currently married. Photographer Stephanie Sinclair embarked on an eight year, multi-country investigation of the phenomenon. Here, she reflects on the experience:

In almost every situation, I wanted to take the girl, throw her over my shoulder and get her out of there. But I learned it is much more complicated than that. As foreigners, we are not in the position to make that kind of immediate decision for her. 
-Photographer Stephanie Sinclair, “Child Marriage: Documenting Sorrow”

At the Pulitzer Center, we think people should be connected with journalists and photographers in real life.
This year, we’ve hosted more than sixty events to bring students and the public face to face with reporters and the international issues they cover. 
Tonight, we’re heading over to National Geographic in DC to discuss the illegal, yet thriving practice of child marriage with images and stories from Stephanie Sinclair and Cynthia Gorney.
We hope to see you there. If not, we’ll be tweeting the event @PulitzerCenter.

Wish I could be there, but I have class. :(

K, so the thing is in not only Islam but almost all theo-religions once a girl reaches puberty she can marry. Just like Mary/Maryam in the Bible/Quran. Human rights is an issue though. Like in Islam if she did not want to get married to him then she has all right.

Either way she has to be consulted and really young girls just agree because of family..that is in Islam..but then again only in those situation…The thing is we should help..these girls..Just because it is allowed doesn’t mean we should just accept it happening.My grandmother was 14 when she got married her husband was 30..do you think she wanted to get married?NopeSociety that she lived in told her that the best thing for a girl is marriage..she was she had to agree.so what it is allowed..i don’t like the idea of it and this picture makes me sad..Maybe she wants to maybe she doesn’t either way she should be given the chance to grow up… 

yourhijabi:

indigirl1993:

theanapologist:

pulitzercenter:

Around the world, more than 51 million girls under 18 are currently married. Photographer Stephanie Sinclair embarked on an eight year, multi-country investigation of the phenomenon. Here, she reflects on the experience:

In almost every situation, I wanted to take the girl, throw her over my shoulder and get her out of there. But I learned it is much more complicated than that. As foreigners, we are not in the position to make that kind of immediate decision for her. 

-Photographer Stephanie Sinclair, “Child Marriage: Documenting Sorrow”

At the Pulitzer Center, we think people should be connected with journalists and photographers in real life.

This year, we’ve hosted more than sixty events to bring students and the public face to face with reporters and the international issues they cover. 

Tonight, we’re heading over to National Geographic in DC to discuss the illegal, yet thriving practice of child marriage with images and stories from Stephanie Sinclair and Cynthia Gorney.

We hope to see you there. If not, we’ll be tweeting the event @PulitzerCenter.

Wish I could be there, but I have class. :(

K, so the thing is in not only Islam but almost all theo-religions once a girl reaches puberty she can marry. Just like Mary/Maryam in the Bible/Quran. Human rights is an issue though. Like in Islam if she did not want to get married to him then she has all right.

Either way she has to be consulted and really young girls just agree because of family..that is in Islam..but then again only in those situation…
The thing is we should help..these girls..
Just because it is allowed doesn’t mean we should just accept it happening.
My grandmother was 14 when she got married her husband was 30..do you think she wanted to get married?
Nope
Society that she lived in told her that the best thing for a girl is marriage..she was she had to agree.so what it is allowed..i don’t like the idea of it and this picture makes me sad..
Maybe she wants to maybe she doesn’t either way she should be given the chance to grow up… 

divagationsonline:

iPhone Photojournalism: Afghanistan

Images from the streets in Afghanistan and the life of some of the soldiers taken with a camera phone. Check out the whole photostream.