but we are actually all winds
ever more than before
even ever more than before 
gaining 
speeding 
booming
towards future 
speeding
and redeeming laughters
and happiest laughters
Start page JUMO | Code for America | good.is |
“If you want to free a society, just give them internet access. Because people, the young guys, you know, are all going to go out and see biased media, see the truth about other nations and their own nation and they’re going to be able to contribute and collaborate together.”
alieninbeirut:

Christmas is…

alieninbeirut:

Christmas is…

alieninbeirut:

Partying in style at Masquerade Edition in Eddie Sands

alieninbeirut:

Partying in style at Masquerade Edition in Eddie Sands

willdrawfor:

Snowfall in Arabsalim, Lebanon

Oh how I miss this little village

flisteen:

DSCN0492 by SyndromeDeStendhal on Flickr.
▸ [Israeli view on deterrence] As Battlefield Changes, Israel Takes Tougher Approach, Ethan Bronner, NYTimes

Tiny bit capturing how Israeli public or majority’s thinking pattern.

It is a bitter pragmatism. But - 

What’s really at the core on this is -

  • the subject of who should have saved Gazans
  • while prohibiting Iranian regime to build up influence/foothold there
  • Exactly same thing happened in southern Lebanon and to its Shia population (and Israeli people are also thinking about Hezbollah in the same way - deterrence have to be reinforced repeatedly, cyclically, over time.) 
  • [‘Responsibility’ - vs. interest, influence, sphere - different IR terms, ideas. How they get applied. Evolution.]

It is all too late. But I should check history of these cases much more closely. What were the limits - for the side of USA, Europe and Gulf powers. What they tried. Or they might never really tried and just looked away, or didn’t have any sufficient interest. 

Sectarianism - is fatalistic thing - and we basically have no intellectual comprehension of it - nor prudent measures - or anything.

(Attention and engagement with sectarian situation, or the marginalized - if there are terrible realistic limit of international relations on these - so be it. That may well be the limit of of what we humans can really be.)

(The current IR discussions about these two locations - is somehow (miraculously?) associating these with the case of Northern Ireland - that what took place in Northern Ireland could take place in Lebanon and Gaza - that those militias could become moderate overtime - turning into a legitimate? or part of legitimate? political entity. While there are probably much more local complexity and probably ideological difference are inescapably accompanying the cases of Lebanon and Gaza.) 

What is striking in listening to the Israelis discuss their predicament is how similar the debate sounds to so many previous ones, despite the changed geopolitical circumstances. In most minds here, the changes do not demand a new strategy, simply a redoubled old one.

The operative metaphor is often described as “cutting the grass,” meaning a task that must be performed regularly and has no end. There is no solution to security challenges, officials here say, only delays and deterrence. That is why the idea of one day attacking Iranian nuclear facilities, even though such an attack would set the nuclear program back only two years, is widely discussed as a reasonable option. That is why frequent raids in the West Bank and surveillance flights over Lebanon never stop.

And that is why this week’s operation in Gaza is widely viewed as having been inevitable, another painful but necessary maintenance operation that, officials here say, will doubtless not be the last.

[…]

Gazans see events in a very different light. The problem, they say, comes from Israel: Israeli drones fill the Gazan skies, Israeli gunboats strafe their waters, Palestinian militants are shot at from the air, and the Gaza border areas are declared off limits by Israel with the risk of death from Israeli gunfire.

But there is little dissent in Israel about the Gaza policy. This week leaders of the leftist opposition praised the assassination of Ahmed al-Jabari, the Hamas military commander, on Wednesday. He is viewed here as the equivalent of Osama bin Laden. The operation could go on for many days before there is any real dissent.



Source: The New York Times

Nov 17, 2012, 8:01pm  0 notes      

▸ [Syria] Lose-lose situation [Assad may intensify situation with Turkey and Israel for the regime's survival], DailyStar Lebanon

Assad’s bet appears to be that if anything, the spillover of Syria’s war into its neighbors will revitalize this attention, but to his benefit. The regime in Damascus believes that the international community will act to pressure the various sides to end the conflict, without the fall of the Baathist regime.

Assad could also be convinced that any concerted international action will generate support domestically for his embattled regime, since many Syrians are loathe to publicly support foreign intervention in what they believe should be a purely domestic affair.

In some ways, this is a common tactic by the Assad regime: It has no qualms about convincing itself, despite all of the available evidence to the contrary, that it is on the way to “victory.”

But it can’t be denied that the regime has lost control of large parts of its territory, and Assad’s Presidential Palace itself has now become another target in the fighting.

If the conflict drags on in such fashion, whoever “wins” in Syria will end up a loser, because of the enormous cost of putting the country back together again.

That is the thing. Newly unified (exile) oppositions - but that really doesn’t eradicate or counter fractures - what’s been already done and accumulated overnight, nor eliminate or lessen the possibility of wider conflicts in the region. Rebels might achieve long desired unity finally now with effective speed, but that’s just remains to be seen. 

Also kind of - yeah, this article doesn’t mention Lebanon is also the target of the Syrian regime - like Turkey and Israel. 



Source: dailystar.com.lb

Nov 12, 2012, 9:18pm  1 note      


The mother and wife of the slain intelligence officer [Brig. Gen. Wissam al-Hassan] mourn Sunday. 

The mother and wife of the slain intelligence officer [Brig. Gen. Wissam al-Hassan] mourn Sunday. 


A Lebanese Sunni Muslim gunman holds an RPG as he walks through the streets in the northern city of Tripoli, as protests take place in the city after the assassination of senior intelligence official Wissam al-Hassan in an explosion in Beirut October 20, 2012.
REUTERS/Omar Ibrahim 

A Lebanese Sunni Muslim gunman holds an RPG as he walks through the streets in the northern city of Tripoli, as protests take place in the city after the assassination of senior intelligence official Wissam al-Hassan in an explosion in Beirut October 20, 2012.

REUTERS/Omar Ibrahim 


Lebanon’s Sunni Muslim Salafist leader Ahmad al-Assir speaks during a protest against the Syria and Iran governments in Beirut, October 14, 2012. Lebanese Sunni Muslim Salafists leader Sheikh Ahmad al-Aseer called on Lebanese armed parties - especially Shi’ite Hezbollah - to give up their arms and have the army and the security forces be the sole possessors of arms in the country. REUTERS/Jamal Saidi 

Lebanon’s Sunni Muslim Salafist leader Ahmad al-Assir speaks during a protest against the Syria and Iran governments in Beirut, October 14, 2012. Lebanese Sunni Muslim Salafists leader Sheikh Ahmad al-Aseer called on Lebanese armed parties - especially Shi’ite Hezbollah - to give up their arms and have the army and the security forces be the sole possessors of arms in the country. REUTERS/Jamal Saidi 


Thousands of people carry flags, including Syrian opposition flags, and a banner with images of Lebanon’s Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah (bottom) and Lebanese Prime Minister Najib Mikati as they gather in downtown Beirut, where slain intelligence officer Wissam al-Hassan is set to be buried next to former prime minister Rafik al-Hariri, October 21,2012.
Thousands of people gathered in central Beirut on Sunday for the funeral of the assassinated senior intelligence officer, accusing Syria of involvement in the killing and calling for Mikati to quit.
The words on the banner read: "Wissam’s blood is your responsibility." 
REUTERS/Hasan Shaaban

Thousands of people carry flags, including Syrian opposition flags, and a banner with images of Lebanon’s Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah (bottom) and Lebanese Prime Minister Najib Mikati as they gather in downtown Beirut, where slain intelligence officer Wissam al-Hassan is set to be buried next to former prime minister Rafik al-Hariri, October 21,2012.

Thousands of people gathered in central Beirut on Sunday for the funeral of the assassinated senior intelligence officer, accusing Syria of involvement in the killing and calling for Mikati to quit.

The words on the banner read: "Wissam’s blood is your responsibility."

REUTERS/Hasan Shaaban

▸ [Israel-Iran] Hezbollah takes responsibility for downed drone, confirms it was manufactured by Iran - Times of Israel

The leader of the Lebanese terrorist group Hezbollah on Thursday claimed responsibility for launching a drone aircraft that was shot down over Israel earlier this week, saying the UAV had been assembled by Hezbollah men using parts provided by Iran. The rare admission by Hassan Nasrallah raises regional tensions at a sensitive time when the group’s backers, Syria and Iran, are under pressure.

Nasrallah said the drone was named the Ayoub, honoring both an Islamic prophet (of patience) and a “martyr” by the name of Hussein Ayoub.

Several hours earlier, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pointed a finger at Hezbollah. ”We’re determined to defend our land, air, and maritime borders, just as when we foiled Hezbollah’s attempt to send a UAV into Israel,” Netanyahu said during a tour of the border with Egypt.



Source: timesofisrael.com

Oct 11, 2012, 3:11pm  0 notes      

sssaltskin:

fuckyeahmiddleeast:

Behind The Tents

A documentary film focusing on the daily lives of the bedouin children living in Bekaa, Lebanon. The film describes and shows what is behind the tents where these children live. It takes you through every aspect of their lives and portrays their feelings. These children share their happy moments, their hard work, and their hopes and dreams.

These were probably the most moving 13 minutes I have ever experienced in my entire life. 

At 3:26, one of the little boys says “they are all lying, none of them are happy”.

I honestly don’t know how to put how I feel right now into words.

Watch this for yourself, I really do recommend it.

EVERYONE SHOULD WATCH THIS.



Reblogged from flisteen-deactivated20131122.

September 15, 2012, 10:21pm  78 notes

Juggling, Aita El Chaab Southern Lebanon 2006 - Rania Matar

Juggling, Aita El Chaab Southern Lebanon 2006 - Rania Matar

▸ [Lebanon: Al Qaeda issues threat against Hezbollah] Daily Star LB

BEIRUT: The recent warning by the Abdallah Azzam Brigades against Shiites in Lebanon amounts to a serious threat of violence that could spark off a resurgence of sectarian conflict in Lebanon.

The statement, which appeared as an audio message on a jihadist website on Aug. 17 and was recently picked up by the media, warned Shiites in Lebanon that “the positions of Hezbollah and the Amal Movement vis-à-vis the Syrian revolution do not serve the sect’s best interest … If you maintain your arrogant attitude, you will be punished, and you will pay. You only have yourselves to blame.”

The message said Shiites in Lebanon would bear the consequences if they insist on linking themselves to the Syrian President Bashar Assad.

“If you stay with him, you shall go with him,” it said.

The statement was attributed to the Abdullah Azzam Brigades, an alleged Al-Qaeda branch that is active in Lebanon and Syria. It has claimed rocket attacks from Lebanon into Israel in the past.

The article goes into experts’ take on this but views Re: how serious the threat can be - are divided.



Source: dailystar.com.lb

Sep 01, 2012, 9:02pm  0 notes      

sssaltskin:

stoptheonion:

Sidon, Libanon - by Ali Hashisho

JABAL EL ZBALEH! Haha a huge trash mountain. Oh Lebanon.

sssaltskin:

stoptheonion:

Sidon, Libanon - by Ali Hashisho

JABAL EL ZBALEH! Haha a huge trash mountain. Oh Lebanon.