but we are actually all winds
ever more than before
even ever more than before 
gaining 
speeding 
booming
towards future 
speeding
and redeeming laughters
and happiest laughters
Start page JUMO | Code for America | good.is |
“If you want to free a society, just give them internet access. Because people, the young guys, you know, are all going to go out and see biased media, see the truth about other nations and their own nation and they’re going to be able to contribute and collaborate together.”

Female voters sing while waiting in line to vote. (Samia Mahgoub / UNDP) 
Libya GNC Elections- Voting Day 07.07.2012 (United Nations Development Programme)

Female voters sing while waiting in line to vote. (Samia Mahgoub / UNDP) 

Libya GNC Elections- Voting Day 07.07.2012 (United Nations Development Programme)

 
“I don’t believe in ideology, as simple as that. I believe ideology is some sort of prison. The new age should be one of creativity, one of initiative, one of risk taking. All of these things are the opposite of ideology.”

July 09, 2012, 11:48pm  2 notes

 
“Women and the youth in Libya combined make up 75% of the population. I met so many wonderful characters, but when I discovered one of the youngest candidates, old beyond her years, who was also pregnant, was 25 years old, I was hopeful that the bridge between the youth and those currently running the country will be repaired. No more ‘brother leader’ or ‘father leader’, now is time to make way for a more maternal Libya.”

July 09, 2012, 5:16pm  0 notes

▸ Libya's Election (Editor's Reader) - Marc Lynch - Foreign Policy, July 8th 2012

Few observers have any illusions that the elections themselves will solve any of Libya’s many problems, from economic woes to the absence of effective state institutions to the continuing role of armed militias. The absence of any prior history of such elections makes it almost impossible to predict the likely winners. And the experience of countless transitional elections elsewhere warns against exaggerated hopes for a smooth political ride to come. There will be fierce struggles for power and positions as a government is formed, existential decisions to be made by the election’s losers about whether and how to contest their defeat, and looming battles about core questions of the country’s identity and direction. But the high participation in and smooth progress of the elections will help to ground those coming political battles within a legitimate, democratic and hopefully resilient institutional framework.

In short, July 7 was only one day in Libya.  But it was a good day.

And then the bottom half of the page lists books and reports re: recent developments in Libya.

Read More »



Jul 09, 2012, 4:55pm  0 notes      

Volunteer election workers counted ballots late Saturday night at a polling station in Benghazi. The leading party, the National Forces Alliance, won about 60 percent of the vote there. [Tomas Munita for The New York Times]

Volunteer election workers counted ballots late Saturday night at a polling station in Benghazi. The leading party, the National Forces Alliance, won about 60 percent of the vote there. [Tomas Munita for The New York Times]

 
“The Libyan people don’t need either liberalism or secularism, or pretenses in the name of Islam, because Islam, this great religion, cannot be used for political purposes.

Islam is much bigger than that.”
Mahmoud Jibril - leader of NFA (National Force Alliance), Election Results in Libya Break an Islamist Wave - David D. Kirkpatrick, NYTimes

July 09, 2012, 4:03pm  1 note

▸ Election Results in Libya Break an Islamist Wave - David D. Kirkpatrick, NYTimes

He [Mahmoud Jibril] and his allies publicly echoed a frequent refrain of Libyan voters who were unsure what to make of re-emergent groups like the Muslim Brotherhood: “Do they think they are more Muslim than we are?”

A political scientist who earned his doctoral degree at the University of Pittsburgh and taught there as well, Mr. Jibril said in a recent interview on Libyan television that friends and neighbors anywhere he has lived would describe him as someone who “goes to the mosque for Friday prayers, and we see that he prays.”

“The Libyan people don’t need either liberalism or secularism, or pretenses in the name of Islam, because Islam, this great religion, cannot be used for political purposes,” he said. “Islam is much bigger than that.”

“Jibril is praying five times a day and fasting, so what is the difference?” asked Suleiman Zoubi, a former judge and political independent in the eastern city of Benghazi who appeared set to win a seat in the congress. Ali Tarhouni, the leader of a fledgling party in Mr. Jibril’s coalition and another former minister in the transitional government, called the results evidence of Libyans’ “moderate” character. But he also attributed their success to familiarity. “People trust us,” he said. “Coming out of a war, with a political vacuum and a security vacuum, people were looking for those they knew were tested in the tough times.”



Source: The New York Times

Jul 09, 2012, 3:59pm  0 notes      

 
“Sharia law, when it was understood in the proper way, managed to create one of the great civilizations in human history. The problem is not with Sharia or Islam; the problem is with the interpretation of Sharia. When we turn Islam into some ritual, into a box, when we say ‘You do this, you are an atheist’ or ‘You do this, and you are a believer,’ this in not helpful to Islam.”

July 09, 2012, 3:43pm  1 note

goldenrouge:

Men show their inked fingers as they celebrate at the end of voting day in Sirte July 7, 2012. Libyans defied violence and boycott calls to rush to the polls in their first free national election in 60 years on Saturday, parting with the legacy of Muammar Gaddafi’s dictatorship. REUTERS/Anis Mili

goldenrouge:

Men show their inked fingers as they celebrate at the end of voting day in Sirte July 7, 2012. Libyans defied violence and boycott calls to rush to the polls in their first free national election in 60 years on Saturday, parting with the legacy of Muammar Gaddafi’s dictatorship. REUTERS/Anis Mili

Libyan Election results are in!

goldenrouge:

Finally. At least for a few cities: Janzour and Zliten. Looks like Mahmoud Jibril is leading (which wasn’t surprising for me because I figured they would gain a large amount of votes since everyone I had talked to was voting for him). For Janzour, Mahmoud Jibril’s party (NAF) is in first place with 26,798 votes. In Zliten, it’s similar, Jibril holding 19,273 votes. 

Now we just have to see how the country reacts.

(akio:) UK’s Guardian also reporting basically Jibril has won. 

Libya’s former interim prime minister Mahmoud Jibril has won a landslide victory in the country’s first democratic election, provisional figures show, defying expectations that the Muslim Brotherhood would sweep to power. Jibril, a moderate who led Libya’s National Transitional Council (NTC) last year, won a clear majority of votes across much of the country, early polling station returns suggest. He is reported to have have won around 80% in the capital, Tripoli, with strong results in the south and 60% in Benghazi, the eastern city that was the NTC’s base during the uprising that overthrew Muammar Gaddafi.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/middle-east-live/2012/jul/09/syria-libya-egypt-live?newsfeed=true

And Daily Beast (and BBC) had an exclusive/first interview with Jibril after the voting:

In an exclusive interview with The Daily Beast and BBC last night, his first with the international media since the polls, he said it is a matter of not “looking at the glass as half empty but half full.” He says the election was a remarkable achievement, arguing that

“1.7 million people voted. That’s the most positive thing in a country where there is no real legacy of democracy whatsoever—this is something unbelievable. This is my focus, focusing on the half of the glass that’s full.”

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/07/09/libya-s-optimistic-leader-mahmoud-jibril-poised-for-historic-election-victory.html

(By Jamie Dettmer) 

Read more

July 09, 2012, 12:29pm   5 notes
goldenrouge:

“Soug al jomaa going nuts…. ‪#LYElect‬.pic.twitter.com/97KmlNwC”

(Souq Al Jomaa - Eastern suburb of Tripoli)

goldenrouge:

Soug al jomaa going nuts…. .

(Souq Al Jomaa - Eastern suburb of Tripoli)

goldenrouge:

“Human shield in ‪#Benghazi‬ to protect voting centers. ‪#LyElect‬ ‪#Libya‬”

goldenrouge:

Human shield in  to protect voting centers.  

▸ Who is running in Libya's election?

(Reuters) - Libya will hold its first free election in a generation on July 7 after last year’s uprising ended Muammar Gaddafi’s 42-year autocratic rule.

The vote is expected to usher in a diverse assembly filled with independents representing competing local interests. It will also be a test for Islamist parties, which have enjoyed success in Tunisian and Egyptian elections after last year’s Arab Spring uprisings.

Parties and political organisations, banned under Gaddafi, have flourished since he was ousted.

Following are some of the better known groups:

* National Forces Alliance: A coalition of 65 liberal parties led by Mahmoud Jibril, the war-time rebel prime minister and U.S.-educated political scientist. Jibril himself is not running for the national assembly.

* Justice and Construction Party: The political branch of the Muslim Brotherhood in Libya, modelled on its Egyptian counterpart. Mohammed Sawan, a former political prisoner under Gaddafi heads the group. The JCP is expected to receive a morale boost in the polls after Egyptians elected a Muslim Brotherhood candidate as president for the first time last month.

* Al-Watan or Homeland: An Islamist group led by former rebel militia leader Abdel Hakim Belhadj. A leader of the now-defunct Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, which waged an insurgency against Gaddafi in the 1990s, Belhadj fought with the Taliban in Afghanistan, where he associated with senior al Qaeda members. He has since distanced himself from the militant group.

Critics say al-Watan is funded by Qatar, which was a key backer of last-year’s NATO-backed rebellion against Gaddafi.

* National Front: Affiliated with the National Front for the Salvation of Libya, this is an offshoot of the Muslim Brotherhood led by intellectual dissident Mohammed al-Magriaf.

* Al-Asala: A Salafi Islamist group led by Sheikh Abdul Bassit Ghweila. It has put forward some female candidates who appear in full face covering on posters. The group believes political parties are un-Islamic and prefers to refer to itself as a “gathering.”

* Centrist Current: Led by Ali Tarhouni, a liberal candidate and war-time oil minister.



Reblogged from yamesmooma.

Jul 07, 2012, 9:07am  4 notes      

Helicopter attack in Benghazi

goldenrouge:

Earlier today a helicopter that was carrying election material for tomorrow’s election was shot at (with a 14.5 mm) and ending up killing one man. The attack was done by pro-federalists who have amped up their violent schemes as the elections near.  You can read more in detail here and here about what has been happening lately with pro-federalist violence.

As of right now, many of the men are still up and patrolling their area to keep it secure from the violence from federalists that are to follow tomorrow. As of right now it’s peaceful and quiet. Although around an hour ago there were sounds of gunshots and explosions, but nothing serious.

I’m hoping Libya stays safe tomorrow and those who are attempting to boycott and abstain from voting because they aren’t receiving equal seats in the assembly still vote. Hundreds of thousands did not die for nothing. They did not only die to remove Gaddafi, they died for Libya, for a better Libya, not for this.

July 06, 2012, 8:34pm   2 notes