but we are actually all winds
ever more than before
even ever more than before 
gaining 
speeding 
booming
towards future 
speeding
and redeeming laughters
and happiest laughters
Start page JUMO | Code for America | good.is |
“If you want to free a society, just give them internet access. Because people, the young guys, you know, are all going to go out and see biased media, see the truth about other nations and their own nation and they’re going to be able to contribute and collaborate together.”
▸ [Saudi Islamic Conference, Syria] Next week's 'Mecca Declaration' will urge Assad to step down

Via Sultan Al Qassemi 

Personally not sure how much it weighs. 

Kuwait’s Al Seyassa: “During the upcoming Organisation of Islamic Conference meeting on Tuesday & Wednesday in Mecca Saudi King Abdallah will present the “Mecca Declaration”, a proposal similar to that which saw former Yemeni president Ali Abdallah Saleh step down from power offering Bashar, his family & all Syrian minorities guarantees of safety. This proposal will rule out any foreign military intervention according to observers. Sources say Arab states have agreed to the proposal but Iran has voiced reservations. Ahmedinejad is expected to obstruct the proposal.”



Source: facebook.com

Aug 11, 2012, 9:40pm  0 notes      

saudistreetart:

more graffiti at the beach by #fropandmuso

saudistreetart:

more graffiti at the beach by #fropandmuso

america-abroad-media:

This month on PRI Public Radio International’s America Abroad: “The Global Water Challenge” The demand for water continues to grow as global population does. Yet less than one percent of the planet’s supply is potable, and estimates suggest that 40% of humanity will not have access to clean water by 2025. We explore the complex issues surrounding this precious resource in Yemen, Australia, Turkey and more! Full episode up NOW http://bit.ly/KeDU8l

More like 
Yemen-Saudi Arabia 
Jordan-Israel-Palestine (regional)
etc etc
how water issues turn into the significant regional concern also can trigger the major destabilization. 
Not a bad coverage. Seems transcripts come with those pages too. 

america-abroad-media:

This month on PRI Public Radio International’s America Abroad: “The Global Water Challenge”

The demand for water continues to grow as global population does. Yet less than one percent of the planet’s supply is potable, and estimates suggest that 40% of humanity will not have access to clean water by 2025.

We explore the complex issues surrounding this precious resource in Yemen, Australia, Turkey and more!

Full episode up NOW http://bit.ly/KeDU8l

More like 

  • Yemen-Saudi Arabia 
  • Jordan-Israel-Palestine (regional)
  • etc etc

how water issues turn into the significant regional concern also can trigger the major destabilization. 

Not a bad coverage. Seems transcripts come with those pages too. 

▸ [London Olympics] One small step for Wujdan, One HUGE leap for Saudi Women! - Saudi Roots

The 16-year old Saudi barely had a minute when the high-ranked Puerto Rican fighter easily beat her, but in my eyes she didn’t lose! she was a champ! She made a whole nation proud of her achievement. She competed in the greatest sporting event of mankind and without a shred of help from the Saudi government. In fact, the government (unlike any other country) not only didn’t support her, but stood in her way. At school they forbid her from participating in sports, and physical education just for being born a women. Outside school by not providing gyms and facilities for women, and as an athlete by not providing any funding for her to compete in the Olympics. Yet despite all of this, she managed to compete in this global event that had hundreds of millions of viewers- What an achievement! She has not only competed for herself, but for every Saudi women out there with a dream. Her accomplishments will loudly tell them that they can do anything they desire, and being a Saudi women will not stand in the way of there dreams! What a role model to be proud of!

Unfortunately, her performance today has highlighted a very horrible treat we have in Saudi – Racism! Because of Wujdan’s historical roots from outside the Arab Isles, she has been targeted with racial slur. The worrying this is, the Saudi authorities don’t take racism seriously, so I expect nothing will be done, and no support will be provided for her to deal with this unacceptable behaviour.

I hope and wish that Wujods participation in the Olympics will highlight the importance of women in sports, and highlight the URGENT need to create facilities and gyms in schools and beyond for females in the Kingdom.



Source: saudiroot.com

Aug 03, 2012, 11:26am  0 notes      

▸ [London Olympics] 82 Seconds to History for Saudi Olympian, WallSt Journal

LONDON—It only lasted 82 seconds, but Wojdan Shaherkani made history.

The 16-year old Saudi judo fighter stepped onto the mats at the London Olympics on Friday and lost in barely a minute when a high-ranked Puerto Rican fighter easily toppled her.

But the rapid defeat didn’t detract from the bout’s significance: Shaherkani became the first woman to compete for Saudi Arabia in the Olympics—a breakthrough moment in the ultraconservative kingdom.

After the match, speaking through a Saudi judo official who translated her brief remarks to a hoard of dozens of reporters, she said she was “excited” and “a bit scared” during her groundbreaking appearance. “Hopefully this is the beginning of a new era,” she added.

It almost didn’t happen. Saudi Arabia, one of the world’s most conservative Muslim countries, agreed last month to send two women to the Olympics, making it the last country to include women on its team. But with days to go before the Games, the International Judo Federation, the sport’s governing body, said she couldn’t compete while wearing a head scarf. Saudi officials, as well as Shaherkani’s father, said she couldn’t compete without one.

The two sides reached a compromise earlier this week, allowing Shaherkani to wear an unspecified form of headgear.

She showed up wearing a white judo robe and black cloth wrapped tightly around her head. Her opponent was Melissa Mojica, one of the world’s top judoka in the heavyweight category.

Shaherkani had never participated in an international judo bout. She was invited to the Olympics in a symbolic attempt to strike a blow for women’s rights in Saudi Arabia. The country prohibits women from playing sports in front of mixed audiences of men and women, and Saudi schools generally don’t provide girls with physical education.

Before the fight, some other judo fighters worried that Shaherkani wasn’t qualified to compete and suggested it could be dangerous for her to square off against Olympic athletes in the violent sport.

Those concerns faded quickly when the bout got under way. Shaherkani used a defensive strategy, trying to deflect Mojica’s advances. She succeeded a few times before Mojica grabbed hold of her and swung her to the ground. That ended the match.

As she walked to the locker room, Shaherkani’s father was waiting. He embraced her in a bear hug, as Shaherkani cried. Her father, a judo referee who taught Shaherkani judo, has been nearly constantly by her side, often with his arm wrapped around her shoulder, partly due to a Saudi edict that she could only participate in the Games if constantly accompanied by a man.

In Saudi Arabia, the initial reaction to Shaherkani’s participation in the games had been fiercely divided. Some welcomed her as a trailblazer. Others derided her and the other Saudi female Olympian, a runner who has yet to compete, as “prostitutes.” The Saudi Olympic Committee itself appears to be struggling to come to terms with the inclusion of women on its squad. The young women weren’t included in a group photo of Saudi Olympic officials posing with the male Saudi Olympic athletes carried by the Saudi Press Agency this week.

On Friday, Shaherkani’s match took place around the time of the main Friday prayer in Saudi Arabia, meaning many people likely didn’t watch it live. But some Saudis were in the crowd to cheer her on.

"It was a very proud moment," said Raf Fatani, a Saudi academic who stood in the stands with a Saudi flag around his neck. Shaherkani didn’t lose because of lack of talent, he said, "she lost because the Saudi government didn’t give young women like her the training opportunity. She made every Saudi individual, man or woman, very proud, win or lose."

On Twitter, Shaherkani’s brother said he’d been passing on the kind words to his sister. “She replied that she is proud to represent the kingdom and all the Saudi women who wanna do sports,” he wrote.

"It’s going to give hope to so many young women," said Alla al Mizyen, a 22-year-old consultant in the Saudi coastal city of Jeddah, who played basketball at an international school and watched Friday’s judo match on television. Saudi girls often are told they can’t play sports. Now, she said, they can point to Shaherkani and say, "No, I can do this, and not only that, but I can go to a global platform like the Olympics."



Source: The Wall Street Journal

Aug 03, 2012, 11:21am  3 notes      

chihuahuawho:

History in the making; Saudi women walking proudly among the Olympic athletes for the first time ever

chihuahuawho:

History in the making; Saudi women walking proudly among the Olympic athletes for the first time ever

 
“What comes after Assad is unknowable today. It could be chaos like the Lebanese civil war in the 1970s. A Sunni military dictator may emerge. The Muslim Brotherhood, which led the 1982 Hama revolt and plays a large role in the current insurrection, may emerge dominant. Almost any conceivable successor regime to Assad’s will likely be hostile to Hizbullah and Iran. A hostile Syria will find many allies in Lebanon eager to turn on Hizbullah.”

Bruce Riedel, What Comes After Assad in Syria? | Brookings Institution

Similar ‘spillover’ - (winning Sunni side on a roll phenomenon) - can take place in Iraq too.

And this means now there is a possibility of connected Sunni corridor - Turkey, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq - emerging -

or some local groups making fast moves to get to it - anyway, by any means. 

July 20, 2012, 12:35pm  1 note

▸ [Saudi Arabia: Shooting and capturing of Shiite Cleric Nimr al-Nimr] Ellen Knickmeyer - Wall St Journal

There was a similarly detailed report from Reuters, but this WallSt Journal piece provides a narration of how the incident happened. (*Not necessarily true or whole truth thing)

Prince Nayef’s death - Shiite Sheik al-Nimr post a video calling for ‘rejoicing’ Prince’s death on Youtube (WallSt Journal says verified it) - then somehow Saudi security force attempted arrest/capture of the Shiek - and that somehow resulted in shootings, injuries and deaths.

And views are that this could only escalate the tension within Saudi Arabia, esp in its Eastern province (Qatif). 

RIYADH—Two protesters were killed amid demonstrations in Saudi Arabia over the shooting and capture by security forces of a Shiite cleric who had called for “rejoicing” over the recent death of the crown prince, activists said Monday.

The arrest of the Saudi cleric, Nimr al-Nimr, disappointed some activists and diplomats who had hoped that the Sunni monarchy might ease up on crackdowns under a new interior minister who had succeeded one considered to be a hard-liner on dissent.

Sheik al-Nimr, known for his fiery speeches against the kingdom’s rulers, played into government worries of opposition figures seeking to incite unrest among Saudi Shiites to destabilize the state and widen the influence of neighboring Iran.

The new interior minister, Ahmed bin Abdulaziz al Saud, succeeded his older brother, former Crown Prince and Interior Minister Nayef, after the prince died on June 16.

Saudi Shiites, who mostly hail from the oil-rich Eastern Province, have long alleged discrimination in majority Sunni Saudi Arabia. Last year, six Shiite protesters died in confrontations with security forces during several protests.

Jafer al-Shayeb, a longtime Shiite activist there, said Monday that the situation had calmed this year.

"But after the developments last night, for today and coming days, we will see more protests and violence," Mr. al-Shayeb said. "It’s not in the interest of anyone."

Shortly after Crown Prince Nayef’s death, Sheik al-Nimr appeared in a sermon posted on YouTube and viewed by The Wall Street Journal calling for “rejoicing” over the prince’s passing.

The video caused a stir among Saudis in a kingdom whose royal family has religious stature and functions as the guardian of Islam’s two holiest shrines. Open criticism by Saudis of the monarchy is rare.

[…]

Despite some earlier Western expectations that a change at the top of the Interior Ministry might bring a softer approach, “change rarely comes quickly” in Saudi Arabia. Jane Kinninmont, a senior research fellow at London-based Chatham House think-tank, noted Monday.

"It’d be too early to expect much of a difference," Ms. Kinninmont said. "If anything, the direct targeting of Sheik Nimr represents an escalation."



Jul 09, 2012, 5:33pm  1 note      

▸ Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood lacks 'political vision,' says Saudi government official - Ahram Online

Anwar Eshki, an advisor to Saudi Arabia’s Cabinet of Ministers and head of the Jeddah-based Middle East Centre for Strategic and Legal Studies, accused Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood of lacking the requisite political vision and experience for governing the country.

Eshki, in an interview with Al-Ahram, expressed his fears on the “doubted aspirations” of the Islamist and most politically-based entity which in the minds of many is seeking to extend its control over the country and pave the way for the reproduction of despotism in Egypt.

"If no roadmap is drawn, the Muslim Brotherhood will have a tripartite stronghold over the executive, legislative and judicial authorities," he stated.

Eshki also described the transitional phase in the post-Mubarak era as a “tough process” for the whole nation, negotiating the different stages of transformation from authoritarianism to a freedom-based political system.

"I hope that democratic progression will be achieved quickly; Egyptians could not afford the price of other alternatives," Eshki said.  

The Brotherhood and Saudi Arabia share Sunni Muslim values, but Riyadh regards the movement as a competitor with an aggressively activist political doctrine that might destabilise allies and foment discord inside the kingdom.

Permeating Saudi worries about the Muslim Brotherhood are decades of ideological rivalry.

Since the 18th century, the ruling Al-Saud family has enjoyed a close alliance with clerics of the ultra-conservative Wahhabi school of Islam.

In the modern kingdom, the royal family has bankrolled the clergy and given them wide-ranging influence over government policy. In return, the clerics have espoused a political philosophy that demands obedience to the ruler, a notion that shaped Saudi dismay at last year’s Arab revolts.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood has always promoted an active political role for Islam, first as a revolutionary organisation and more lately as a force in democratic politics.

Some Saudi leaders have accused the Brotherhood of inspiring the kingdom’s main domestic opposition group, the Sahwa movement that in the 1990s agitated to bring democracy to Saudi Arabia.

Last month, Ahmed Al-Qattan, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to Egypt, stressed that the oil-rich kingdom does not support any particular Egyptian presidential candidate over another, refuting allegations that his country is pushing for an Islamist Egyptian president.

Al-Qattan’s words, according a press release issued by the Saudi Embassy in Cairo, came in a meeting with presidential contender Mohamed Mursi, head of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), outside the embassy’s premises.



Jun 21, 2012, 8:18pm  2 notes      

▸ 10 voices for change in Saudi Arabia, Christa Case Bryant, Christian Science Monitor, May 30 2012

  • 1.Sheikh Salman al-Ouda
Sheikh Salman al-Ouda spoke to a group of US journalists in his home in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, earlier this month.
(Christa Case Bryant/The Christian Science Monitor)

Prominent Salafi cleric, with more than 1 million Twitter followers

"To debate and consult the citizen in decisions and policies … [and] elections, I think Islam gave us that sort of democracy – all caliphs were elected by their people…. The problem here is with the philosophical democracy without a limit…. For example, it’s impossible one day within an Islamic system to have a debate on homosexuality … since it is religiously forbidden."

  • 2.Samar Fatany
Samar Fatany, Radio journalist: ‘It’s no good to be a rebel … you’re going to be marginalized…. So I think people want to [pursue reform] with wisdom and patience so they can influence change and have their way with these hardliners in society.’
(Christa Case Bryant/The Christian Science Monitor)

Radio journalist and women’s rights advocate

"It’s no good to be a rebel … you’re going to be marginalized…. So I think people want to [pursue reform] with wisdom and patience so they can influence change and have their way with these hard-liners in society."

  • 3.Fahad al-Butairi

US-educated comedian with the wildly popular YouTube show La Yekthar (‘Put a lid on it’)

“I think the government likes what we’re doing, because it’s releasing some pressure.”

Here is the most popular episode to date, which takes aim at the government’s relatively new anticorruption campaign. It has gotten nearly 3.5 million hits so far. (Click “CC” for English subtitles.)

  • 4.Dr. Maha Almuneef

Pediatrician, executive director of the National Family Safety Program, and one of 12 women appointed as consultants to the Shura Council*

"A lot of women activists are against us as consultants. They said, ‘You are there just to improve the picture of Saudi Arabia in the West; you are not very active in this.’ They were right…. However, I do believe that we as consultants were really treated as full members, and we were really taken seriously.”

*The Shura Council is comprised of 150 appointed members, all of whom are male, together with a dozen female “consultants.”

  • 5.Mohammed al-Qahtani
Mohammed al-Qahtani recently declared Crown Prince Nayef bin Abdulaziz unfit to become king.

Economics professor and prominent human rights advocate

“It’s a very difficult time…. You’re going after a regime that is very entrenched, with lots of outside support, lots of oil that the international economy depends on, and it’s very easy for [other countries] to look the other way…. But believe me, we can weather it….

“Our goal is to reach a situation where the regime is bound by its own law.”

  • 6.Wesal Abu al-Khair
Ms. Abu al-Khair takes time out from preparing for medical school exams to speak to a group of US journalists at King Abdulaziz University in the coastal city of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
(Christa Case Bryant/The Christian Science Monitor)

Medical student, King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah

"Revolution is not necessary to change a country – the people themselves need to change and to understand how change is important in order for us to be able to revolutionize. If the king changed, even if the system changed, if people don’t understand how change is important, we’re not going to build anything…. We’re going to be like Egypt exactly.”

  • 7.Prince alWaleed bin Talal bin Abdulaziz al-Saud
Prince alWaleed has used his significant wealth and media holdings to press for more openness in Saudi society, as well as greater cultural understanding between Islamic countries and the West.

Businessman and media magnate ranked 29th on Forbes' billionaire list

“The revolution that took place around us [the Arab Spring] was a wake-up call…. No one will say it, but it was the catalyst.”

  • 8.Princess Ameerah al-Taweel
Princess Ameerah has overseen a considerable expansion of the AlWaleed bin Talal Foundations’ work over the past year and a half, including everything from handing out cars and appliances to Jeddah flood victims to training newly hired saleswomen in lingerie stores.

Wife of Prince alWaleed and vice-chairwoman of the board of trustees of the AlWaleed bin Talal Foundations

"When you find a conservative person, most likely they are attacking liberals [and vice versa] … We don’t attack anyone. We believe the majority are in the middle – they love religion, they love tradition…. The voices that are really high are on either end."

  • 9.Lamya AlAbdulkarim

Businesswoman who recently co-founded a girls’ soccer program in Riyadh

"Sport is a window to so many things – this is … a small window [into change]."

  • 10.Usamah al-Kurdi

Member of the Shura Council and chairman of the US-Saudi Congressional Friendship Committee

"The ballot box is not the only sign of democracy."


‘It’s no good to be a rebel … you’re going to be marginalized…. So I think people want to [pursue reform] with wisdom and patience so they can influence change and have their way with these hardliners in society.’


Source: csmonitor.com

Jun 01, 2012, 6:02pm  0 notes      

 
“When the Riyadh game ends, athletes and fans stream onto the field – some with abayas flowing in the warm wind, others wearing shorts and neon cleats. One team gets a trophy, but both are beaming. “I think our generation is starting the game and the basics,” says the AlYamamah captain. “But the next generation will have it, as we say in Arabic, on a plate of silver.””

Saudi girls find freedom in cleats - Christa Case Bryant, Christian Science Monitor, May 30 2012

*Cleats - spike shoes for soccer in this case 

June 01, 2012, 4:37pm  0 notes

▸ [London Olympic and Sports for Women in Saudi Arabia] Like mother, like daughter: Dalma Malhas breaks a barrier with a winning ride | IndianMuslimObserver

Malhas inherited her passion for equestrian sport from her mother Arwa Mutabagani, whose competitive performances had made her one of the top equestriennes in her heyday. Today, following her sterling displays, she is a board member at the Saudi Equestrian Federation from 2008.
Though her mother was an excellent rider, Malhas’ passion and grit made all the difference in the Singapore event from Aug. 14-26 for the age group 14-18. Her efforts won her the bronze and also made her the third Saudi Arabian athlete to land a medal in Olympics. […]
Though equestrian means a lot to Saudi Arabian culture and religion, it is not an easy sport for anyone to practice in the Kingdom, especially because sports is not encouraged for women, due to traditional and cultural restrictions. Malhas, however, was fortunate to be brought up in an open-minded family. She opened her eyes and found herself surrounded by horses at the Mutabagani’s Trio Ranch, which belongs to her mother in Jeddah.


Source: indianmuslimobserver.com

Jun 01, 2012, 4:21pm  1 note      

Dalma Rushdi Malhas atop Flash Top Hat in Singapore’s Youth Olympics in 2010. (Reuters)
One Woman Team: Saudi Evades Olympic Ban. But Only Just.
Saudi Arabia in a bid to avoid being barred from the 2012 London Olympics has agreed to send a token female equestrian to the tournament to represent the conservative kingdom that effectively discourages women’s sports.
The decision followed a warning last year by Anita DeFrantz, the chair of the International Olympic Committee’s Women and Sports Commission, that Saudi Arabia alongside Qatar and Brunei could be barred if they did not send for the first time at least one female athlete to the London Olympics.
An earlier agreement by Qatar, the only other country whose indigenous population are largely Wahhabis, adherents of a puritan interpretation of Islam predominant in Saudi Arabia, to field a women’s team in London increased the pressure on the kingdom to follow suit.
The decision however is likely to prove less controversial  in Qatar than Saudi Arabia. Qatar has far fewer of Saudi Arabia’s sharper edges such as a ban on women’s driving, strict gender segregation and a culture that enshrines male dominance.
Saudi Arabia’s most likely female athlete is 18-year old equestrienne Dalma Rushdi Malhas who won a bronze medal in the 2010 Singapore Youth Olympics. At the time, Ms. Malhas was not officially delegated to compete in Singapore on behalf of the kingdom.
“I didn’t know whether I was allowed but when I got invited of course I didn’t think twice and went at my own expense, I didn’t care much about me being there as a representative of Saudi Arabia, because anyone could probably do that. But getting a medal was the key, and that’s not easy for anyone, and I wanted that — and only that gives recognition to my country,” she told the Arab News.
Despite official discouragement women have increasingly been pushing the envelope at times with the support of more liberal members of the ruling Al Saud family, The kingdom’s toothless Shura or Advisory Council has issued regulations for women’s sports clubs, but conservative religious forces often have the final say.
http://mideastposts.com/2011/11/one-woman-team-saudi-arabia-evades-olympic-ban-but-only-just/

Dalma Rushdi Malhas atop Flash Top Hat in Singapore’s Youth Olympics in 2010. (Reuters)

One Woman Team: Saudi Evades Olympic Ban. But Only Just.

Saudi Arabia in a bid to avoid being barred from the 2012 London Olympics has agreed to send a token female equestrian to the tournament to represent the conservative kingdom that effectively discourages women’s sports.

The decision followed a warning last year by Anita DeFrantz, the chair of the International Olympic Committee’s Women and Sports Commission, that Saudi Arabia alongside Qatar and Brunei could be barred if they did not send for the first time at least one female athlete to the London Olympics.

An earlier agreement by Qatar, the only other country whose indigenous population are largely Wahhabis, adherents of a puritan interpretation of Islam predominant in Saudi Arabia, to field a women’s team in London increased the pressure on the kingdom to follow suit.

The decision however is likely to prove less controversial  in Qatar than Saudi Arabia. Qatar has far fewer of Saudi Arabia’s sharper edges such as a ban on women’s driving, strict gender segregation and a culture that enshrines male dominance.

Saudi Arabia’s most likely female athlete is 18-year old equestrienne Dalma Rushdi Malhas who won a bronze medal in the 2010 Singapore Youth Olympics. At the time, Ms. Malhas was not officially delegated to compete in Singapore on behalf of the kingdom.

“I didn’t know whether I was allowed but when I got invited of course I didn’t think twice and went at my own expense, I didn’t care much about me being there as a representative of Saudi Arabia, because anyone could probably do that. But getting a medal was the key, and that’s not easy for anyone, and I wanted that — and only that gives recognition to my country,” she told the Arab News.

Despite official discouragement women have increasingly been pushing the envelope at times with the support of more liberal members of the ruling Al Saud family, The kingdom’s toothless Shura or Advisory Council has issued regulations for women’s sports clubs, but conservative religious forces often have the final say.

http://mideastposts.com/2011/11/one-woman-team-saudi-arabia-evades-olympic-ban-but-only-just/

▸ International donors pledge $4bn for Yemen, BBC

International donors have pledged more than $4bn (£2.54bn) in aid to Yemen, which is facing a possible humanitarian catastrophe.

Neighbouring Saudi Arabia is providing the bulk of the funds, promising $3.25bn to help the goverment improve infrastructure and security.

Aid agencies have warned that Yemen is on the brink of food crisis

At an international conference on Yemen, the Sanaa government is thought to have asked for some $10bn in help.

Yemen has been shaken by pro-democracy protests, communal unrest in the north and an Islamist conflict in the south.

Attending the “Friends of Yemen” conference in Riyadh, Saudi Foreign Minister Saud al-Faisal said the funds were aimed at achieving stability in Yemen.

The UK Minister for International Development, Alan Duncan, said: “Without that support, the alternative is a slide towards state failure and an increased threat from international terrorism.”

In a joint warning on Tuesday, a group of seven charities said that 10 million Yemenis - 44% of the population - were currently undernourished, with five million requiring emergency aid. […]

In their warning, the aid agencies - Care, International Medical Corps, Islamic Relief, Merlin, Mercy Corps, Oxfam and Save the Children - say malnutrition rates have doubled in the country since 2009, partly as a result of a surge in food and fuel prices.

The problem has been exacerbated by political instability and conflict, with nearly half a million people displaced from their homes by fighting.

Markets across much of Yemen have food available, but many Yemenis cannot afford to feed their families, the aid groups warned.

"Yemeni families are at the brink and have exhausted their ways of coping with this crisis," Oxfam’s international director, Penny Lawrence, said.

"Mothers are taking their children out of school to beg on the streets to get money to survive."

But then - who are not selling those foods? (Unperishables?) Kind of slightly not making sense. 



May 24, 2012, 2:20am  0 notes