but we are actually all winds
ever more than before
even ever more than before 
gaining 
speeding 
booming
towards future 
speeding
and redeeming laughters
and happiest laughters
Start page JUMO | Code for America | good.is |
“If you want to free a society, just give them internet access. Because people, the young guys, you know, are all going to go out and see biased media, see the truth about other nations and their own nation and they’re going to be able to contribute and collaborate together.”
▸ Islam and science: The road to renewal, The Economist

Science and technology-related subjects, with their clear practical benefits, do best. Engineering dominates, with agricultural sciences not far behind. Medicine and chemistry are also popular. Value for money matters. Fazeel Mehmood Khan, who recently returned to Pakistan after doing a PhD in Germany on astrophysics and now works at the Government College University in Lahore, was told by his university’s vice-chancellor to stop chasing wild ideas (black holes, in his case) and do something useful.

Science is even crossing the region’s deepest divide. In 2000 SESAME, an international physics laboratory with the Middle East’s first particle accelerator, was set up in Jordan. It is modelled on CERN, Europe’s particle-physics laboratory, which was created to bring together scientists from wartime foes. At SESAME Israeli boffins work with colleagues from places such as Iran and the Palestinian territories.



Jan 28, 2013, 4:44pm  4 notes      

 
“In a way, Science teaches us that everything is not about how strongly we believe in what we believe in.”

- Rush Holt (quoted from my memory, can’t locate audio clip yet)

He is a US congressman (NJ, Democrat) - a Quaker (Christian), a scientist (physicist). And - 

Holt was a faculty member at Swarthmore College from 1980 to 1988 where he taught physics, public policy, and religion courses

  • He just published 

US election: Politicians should think like scientists in Nature [*behind paywall]

September 27, 2012, 9:38am  5 notes

alonein-kyoto:

The world of programming. 

alonein-kyoto:

The world of programming. 

The oldest surviving illustrated manuscript written in Arabic on any subject is a manuscript on paper of Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi’s Treatise on the Fixed Stars preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford [Ms. Marsh 144. p. 165].

"The pictures show the configurations of the stars in the forty-eight constellations recognized by Ptolemy, but the figures are dressed in Oriental rather than classical Greek garb. Al-Sufi wrote in his text that although he knew of another illustrated astronomical treatise, he copied his illsutrations directly from images engraved on a celestial globe, indicating that he was not working in a manuscript tradition.
According to the eleventh-century scholar al-Biruni, al-Sufi explained that he had laid a very thin piece of paper over a celestial globe and fitted it carefully over the surface of the sphere. He then traced the outlines of the constellations and the locations of individual stars on the paper. Al-Biruni later commented that this procedure ‘is an [adequate] approximation when the figures are small but it is far [from adequate] if they are large.’
The Oxford manuscript of al-Sufi’s text was copied from the author’s original by his son” (Bloom, Paper Before Print. The History and Impact of Paper in the Islamic World [2001]  143-44 and figure 51).

The oldest surviving illustrated manuscript written in Arabic on any subject is a manuscript on paper of Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi’s Treatise on the Fixed Stars preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford [Ms. Marsh 144. p. 165].

"The pictures show the configurations of the stars in the forty-eight constellations recognized by Ptolemy, but the figures are dressed in Oriental rather than classical Greek garb. Al-Sufi wrote in his text that although he knew of another illustrated astronomical treatise, he copied his illsutrations directly from images engraved on a celestial globe, indicating that he was not working in a manuscript tradition.

According to the eleventh-century scholar al-Biruni, al-Sufi explained that he had laid a very thin piece of paper over a celestial globe and fitted it carefully over the surface of the sphere. He then traced the outlines of the constellations and the locations of individual stars on the paper. Al-Biruni later commented that this procedure ‘is an [adequate] approximation when the figures are small but it is far [from adequate] if they are large.’

The Oxford manuscript of al-Sufi’s text was copied from the author’s original by his son” (Bloom, Paper Before Print. The History and Impact of Paper in the Islamic World [2001]  143-44 and figure 51).


The Book of Fixed Stars (in Arabic: كتاب صور الكواكب /kitab suwar al kawakib/) is an astronomical text written by Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi (Azophi) around 964. The book was written in Arabic, although the author himself was Persian. It was an attempt to create a synthesis of the most popular classical work of astronomy — Ptolemy’s Almagest — with the indigenous Arabic tradition, or Anwa.
The book was thoroughly illustrated along with observations and descriptions of the stars, their positions, their magnitudes (brightness) and their color. His results were set out constellation by constellation. For each constellation, he provided two drawings, one from the outside of a celestial globe, and the other from the inside.
The work was highly influential and survives in numerous manuscripts and translations. The oldest manuscript, kept in the Bodleian Library, dates to AD 1009 and is the work of the author’s son.
He has the earliest known descriptions and illustrations of what he called “A Little Cloud” which is actually the Andromeda Galaxy. He mentions it as lying before the mouth of a Big Fish, an Arabicconstellation. This “cloud” was apparently commonly known to the Isfahan astronomers, very probably before 905 AD. The first recorded mention of the Large Magellanic Cloud was also given by Abd Al-Rahman Al Sufi in his Book of Fixed Stars. These were the first galaxiesother than the Milky Way to be observed from Earth. The Great Andromeda Nebula he observed was also the first true nebula to be observed, as distinct from a star cluster.
He probably also cataloged the Omicron Velorum star cluster as a “nebulous star”, and an additional “nebulous object” in Vulpecula, a cluster now variously known as Al Sufi’s Cluster, the “Coathanger asterism”, Brocchi’s Cluster or Collinder 399. Moreover, he mentions the Large Magellanic Cloud as Al Bakr, the White Ox, of the southern Arabs as it is visible from SouthernArabia, although not from more northern latitudes.

The Book of Fixed Stars (in Arabic: كتاب صور الكواكب /kitab suwar al kawakib/) is an astronomical text written by Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi (Azophi) around 964. The book was written in Arabic, although the author himself was Persian. It was an attempt to create a synthesis of the most popular classical work of astronomy — Ptolemy’s Almagest — with the indigenous Arabic tradition, or Anwa.

The book was thoroughly illustrated along with observations and descriptions of the stars, their positions, their magnitudes (brightness) and their color. His results were set out constellation by constellation. For each constellation, he provided two drawings, one from the outside of a celestial globe, and the other from the inside.

The work was highly influential and survives in numerous manuscripts and translations. The oldest manuscript, kept in the Bodleian Library, dates to AD 1009 and is the work of the author’s son.

He has the earliest known descriptions and illustrations of what he called “A Little Cloud” which is actually the Andromeda Galaxy. He mentions it as lying before the mouth of a Big Fish, an Arabicconstellation. This “cloud” was apparently commonly known to the Isfahan astronomers, very probably before 905 AD. The first recorded mention of the Large Magellanic Cloud was also given by Abd Al-Rahman Al Sufi in his Book of Fixed Stars. These were the first galaxiesother than the Milky Way to be observed from Earth. The Great Andromeda Nebula he observed was also the first true nebula to be observed, as distinct from a star cluster.

He probably also cataloged the Omicron Velorum star cluster as a “nebulous star”, and an additional “nebulous object” in Vulpecula, a cluster now variously known as Al Sufi’s Cluster, the “Coathanger asterism”, Brocchi’s Cluster or Collinder 399. Moreover, he mentions the Large Magellanic Cloud as Al Bakr, the White Ox, of the southern Arabs as it is visible from SouthernArabia, although not from more northern latitudes.

Light Switches Brain Pathway On-and-Off to Dissect How Anxiety Works

fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

Scientists, for the first time, have switched anxiety on-and-off in active animals by shining light at a brain pathway. Instinctively reclusive mice suddenly began exploring normally forbidding open spaces when a blue laser activated the pathway – and retreated into a protected area when it dimmed. By contrast, anxiety-like behaviors increased when an amber laser inhibited the same pathway.

Researchers, supported in part by NIMH, used a virus, genetic engineering and fiber-optics to control the pathway in the brain’s fear center with millisecond precision.

“Our findings reveal how balanced antagonistic brain pathways are continuously regulating anxiety,” explained Karl Deisseroth, M.D., Ph.D., of Stanford University, a practicing psychiatrist as well as a neuroscientist. “We have pinpointed an anxiety-quelling pathway and demonstrated a way to control it that may hold promise for new types of anti-anxiety treatments.”

NIMH grantees Deisseroth, Kay M. Tye, Ph.D., and colleagues, report on their findings March 17, 2011 in the journal Nature.

Read More

April 12, 2012, 6:47pm   74 notes
 
“There are three kinds of men:
The ones that learn by reading.
The few who learn by observation.
The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence and find out for themselves.”

Will Rogers

(via ronbarak)

March 24, 2012, 12:13pm  7 notes

 
“Is this the long-awaited “exercise drug” that will make sedentary chubsters lean and fit? Dream on, couch potatoes; it’s a long road from mice to man. “Whether long treatments with irisin an/or higher doses would cause more weight loss remains to be determined,” the authors wrote.”

A new hormone [Irisin] revs up the body’s fat-burning engine - latimes.com

Editor was on vacation …? (Or it’s just Los Angeles talking)

January 16, 2012, 11:50pm  24 notes

▸ Old Mice Made "Young"—May Lead to Anti-Aging Treatments [Stem cells produce anti-aging substance]

When injected with muscle stem cells from young mice, older mice with a condition that causes them to age rapidly saw a threefold increase in their life spans, said study co-author Johnny Huard, a stem-cell expert at the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine in Pittsburgh.

[……]

The scientists went back to the lab to test another idea: that stem cells secrete some kind of mysterious anti-aging substance.

The team put stem cells from the fast-aging mice on one side of a flask and stem cells from normal, young mice on the other side. The two sides were separated by a membrane that prevented the cells from touching.

Within days, the aging stem cells began acting “younger”—in other words, they began dividing more quickly.

"We can conclude that probably normal stem cells secrete something we don’t know that seems to improve the defects in those aging stem cells," Huard said.

"If we can identify that, we have found an anti-aging protein that is going to be important" for people, said Huard, whose study appeared January 3 in the journal Nature Communications.



Jan 12, 2012, 2:10am  24 notes      

How FDA Effects Pharmaceutical Stocks

moxielicious:

Company makes drug. It’s controversial but innovative.

FDA backs drugs, despite some risk for respiratory failure (in this case)

The stock increases by 70% overnight!

You know what the vote was? 9-8 voting passage…

Read the article here.

Later that day the FDA sends out a report about the drug.

Stock decreases by 44.5%.

That’s a roller coaster day on the stock market if I ever say one.

Read more here

no insider deals no no

December 13, 2011, 3:06pm   12 notes
 
“Scientists don’t lead marching armies. Scientists don’t invade other nations. Yes, we have scientists who invented the bomb, but somebody had to pay for the bomb and that was taxpayers. That was war bonds. There was a political action that called for it. So everyone blames the scientist. We are collectively part of a society that is using or not using, to its benefit or to its detriment, the discoveries made my science. And at the end of the day, a discovery itself is not moral; It’s our application of it that has to pass that test.”

Neil deGrasse Tyson on the moral obligations of science. (via marxisforbros)

This is why I dislike Neil deGrasse Tyson. What a ridiculous quote.

Many scientists have played some of the nastiest roles during the course of human history. There was a serious lack of moral consideration for the repercussions of creating a nuclear weapon during the Manhattan Project and, as Oppenheimer said, the team went ahead quite simply because they said they wanted to see if they could do it. They were excited after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki because they could see how the weapons they created effected humans. Scientists create the weaponry militaries use. Neil’s logic is similar to what NRA members spew: “Guns don’t kill people. People kill people!”

To say science is amoral under the guise of the purity of academic discovery is ridiculous. Unfortunately, the field of science has a dark history. What about eugenics? What about harmful GMOs? What about lobotomies, vivisection, and medical testing? Sometimes scientists do lead marching armies.

(via mohandasgandhi)

Yap

November 28, 2011, 10:59am  206 notes


  Vesicles of The Neuron
  
  A colorized scanning EM of a nerve broken open to reveal the vesicles containing the neurotransmitters.
  
  Image Credit: NIH, via Curiosity/Discovery, via Sloth Unleashed

Vesicles of The Neuron

A colorized scanning EM of a nerve broken open to reveal the vesicles containing the neurotransmitters.

Image Credit: NIH, via Curiosity/Discovery, via Sloth Unleashed

karleybodis:

Troublemaker

karleybodis:

Troublemaker

mothernaturenetwork:

Male crickets are very chivalrousMale crickets lay down their lives for their mates, protecting them from birds and other predators.

mothernaturenetwork:

Male crickets are very chivalrous
Male crickets lay down their lives for their mates, protecting them from birds and other predators.