but we are actually all winds
ever more than before
even ever more than before 
gaining 
speeding 
booming
towards future 
speeding
and redeeming laughters
and happiest laughters
Start page JUMO | Code for America | good.is |
“If you want to free a society, just give them internet access. Because people, the young guys, you know, are all going to go out and see biased media, see the truth about other nations and their own nation and they’re going to be able to contribute and collaborate together.”
 
“Name one person that isn’t admitting that Romney has had his worst week yet. Not exactly what you want with 7 weeks to go. Obama can still make some serious mistake, and people still have to vote; but the trend is that Romney has lost the race.

As of last week, Obama had won if the election had been held that day. Romney now has to fight to get back to last week. We’re near the end of Sept, Romney doesn’t have the time or money to make mistakes.

and FYI, I don’t think either party should be happy about winning the White House this year. There are some very troubling signs in the economy which cannot be fixed by policy. If the GOP wins all 3 branches, heavy budget cutting measures could cause the economy to plummet which would greatly harm the GOP in the future. The GOP should be happy to let Obama and the Dems take the blame for the 2012-2016 economy.”

September 30, 2012, 6:30pm  2 notes

▸ [Clint Eastwood, RNC Chair Talk] 2011 Interview, re: USA Politics, Daily Mail UK

Eastwood may be a conservative with a small ‘c’ but his politics are not so easily defined. 

‘My dad was fiscally conservative and I was influenced by that. He didn’t believe in spending more than you had because it gets you into trouble. But he was also very understanding of other people’s feelings – religious or whatever – and letting people live the lives they wanted, so he was socially a liberal.

‘And I became more of a libertarian – let’s leave everybody alone, quit screwing with everybody and don’t over-regulate. It’s about giving people a chance to live by their own decisions. And today the liberals aren’t really liberal at all because they won’t leave people alone, and a lot of the conservatives have lost their way fiscally. That’s why the UK, America, Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Spain are all in a mess right now.’

He was opposed to the war in Iraq. 

‘I didn’t understand why we invaded, and I still don’t. It’s the same with Afghanistan. I want the troops from Great Britain and the U.S. to be successful, but by the same token Afghanistan has always been a screw-up. The Russians, who live right next door, couldn’t prevail there, so what are we doing?’

In the last U.S. election he voted for the Republican candidate John McCain rather than Barack Obama. 

‘The first time I voted I was in the army. It was during the Korean War and I voted Republican because it was Eisenhower and he was somewhat heroic to all of us from World War II. So I became a Republican, but I’ve supported Democrats at times, and I don’t necessarily adhere to one line. Sometimes parties make mistakes – they both have. And our parties are in terrible shape – these days we don’t know where the hell they are.

‘I voted for McCain, not because he was a Republican, but because he had been through war (in Vietnam) and I thought he might understand the war in Iraq better than somebody who hadn’t. I didn’t agree with him on a lot of stuff. 

'I loved the fact that Obama is multi-racial. I thought that was terrific, as my wife is the same racial make-up. But I felt he was a greenhorn, and it turned out he didn’t have experience in decision-making.’

Eastwood has first-hand experience of politics – he was elected mayor of his home town, Carmel, in 1986 and served for two years. 

‘I wanted to change the way people looked at public service in that particular town because I lived there. I saw what was happening with a bunch of old-time retirees who sat there, lording it over people and taking terrible advantage rather than being public servants, which is what they’re supposed to be. But I didn’t want to stand again – to do it twice would have been repetitive.’



Source: Daily Mail

Sep 01, 2012, 1:36pm  0 notes      

▸ [Clint Eastwood, RNC Chair Talk] 2011 Interview, includes his take on USA Politics

  1. UK Daily Mail’s long interview - from January 2011. 
  2. The part relevant with RNC chair performance is [USA Politics&Economy] - near bottom. 
  3. There could be other interview detailing his views on war, America’s history (esp post-war), and partisan politics - and also what he tried in Carmel and what he found etc. 
  4. Better than ‘RNC chair talk’ but not satisfactory. 
  5. I don’t find him being ‘libertarian’ in this at all. 
((
  1. I don’t think American people really understand how ‘credit’ and culture(s) for it is crucial thing for contemporary economy to be performing. There are major, multiple key points in the large mechanism of this ‘credit’ - in a national and global economy.
  2. And I think you need (specific) ‘culture’(s) to maintain the control of those key points of credit system. (And this is the point many corruption, collusion, manipulation - and ‘criminal stuff’ takes place.) 
  3. But American experts really don’t explain this in orderly way to public, (it seems)
  4. And American public just get fed with very partial, limited and biased explanation. 
  5. Have to find is there any one explaining this really thoroughly. How it works as crucial mechanism - and why ‘culture’ - of people in charge and involved at each key location is critical. 

))

[Afterlife/Near death experience] 

Eastwood is 80, with a good head of steel-grey hair and a tanned, lined face, but he still works like a man half his age. Although, he admits, thoughts of mortality are never far away these days. Indeed, his latest film as director, Hereafter, tackles head-on the subject of life after death.

‘You’re forced to think about death a lot at this age,’ he says, ‘because you’ve lost a lot of people. Let’s put it this way, there wouldn’t be much point in me attending a high-school reunion now because there wouldn’t be anybody there. We’d struggle to raise a quorum. I picked up the paper the other day and another two were gone – people I’d grown up with. 

'Whether you like it or not, you’re forced to come to the realisation that death is out there. But I don’t fear death, I’m a fatalist. I believe when it’s your time, that’s it. It’s the hand you’re dealt. And I don’t feel any different to how I did when I was 60 or 70. I felt good then, and I feel good now.’

Hereafter is three connected stories about people searching for answers about the afterlife – a London teenager who loses his twin in a road accident; a French TV journalist who survives an Asian tsunami and believes she has glimpsed another world; and a reluctant medium, played by Matt Damon.

Eastwood knows that by making this film now, as he enters his ninth decade, everyone will assume he’s preoccupied with the Grim Reaper and hoping, as we all do, that there’s something else after we pass on.

‘I don’t know if it altered my view of whether there is an afterlife or not,’ he says. ‘But it made me conscious of the fact that there are a vast number of people who do believe in it. Almost all religions seem to embrace that idea, and I don’t know whether that’s just because of man’s desire to have an afterlife. It’s a fantasy in a way because we don’t want the train to stop.

‘I talked to a lot of people who have had near-death experiences and they all seem to paint the same picture, of the same visions, premonitions, call it what you will. I’ve had moments when I’ve thought about somebody, picked up the phone to call them and they are on the line already, and I think that maybe there’s some vibration, some connection.

‘I think there’s something that the mind can conjure up, but whether somebody can actually talk to the afterlife is something that I’d need to have a little more evidence of. I’m a practicalist, but it’s an interesting idea because it makes you think.’

[…]

Making Hereafter has made Eastwood think hard about religion – although he admits his parents, Clinton Senior, a steel worker, and mother Ruth didn’t raise him to be particularly religious. 

‘My parents would take me to a church, but it was always a different place. They were Protestants and one church would be Episcopalian, another would be Presbyterian and another would be Methodist. I remember my father saying, “You’ve got to go to church tomorrow”, and I was a little kid and I said to him, “How come you don’t go?” And he said, “Well, it’s my only day off and I want to sleep.” And I said, “Well, it’s my only day off too.” And he said, “OK, don’t go.” I think he wanted to expose me to a certain amount of religion in order to see if I had any feelings for it and whether it was something I wanted to carry through life.

‘I was always respectful of people who were deeply religious because I always felt that if they gave themselves to it, then it had to be important to them. But if you can go through life without it, that’s OK, too. It’s whatever suits you.

‘I do believe in self-help. I’m not a New Age person but I do believe in meditation, and for that reason I’ve always liked the Buddhist religion. When I’ve been to Japan I’ve been to Buddhist temples and meditated and I found that rewarding. 

'It wasn’t about believing in somebody or something creating miracles, it was just a tool in order to help you reach a certain tranquillity and maybe take you away from living in the fast lane. I do believe that some people have premonitions, but whether that’s psychic, I don’t know.’

[Korean War]

He does, however, believe in fate. When he was just 21, Eastwood had his first brush with death. He was waiting to be dispatched to the front line in Korea in 1951, and was being flown back to his base in California when the aircraft ran out of fuel and crash-landed off the coast. 

‘If the plane had spun out of control it would have been a different ending,’ he says.

‘But the pilot made a really good landing and we both got out into the water. I started swimming and, luckily, I was a pretty good swimmer. I was in the water for about an hour but it seemed like a lot longer, as you lose track of time. Afterwards people asked me, “Did you have some kind of religious experience? Did you pray?”

'But I just needed to keep going. I could see these lights way off in the distance and I imagined that there was probably some guy in one of those houses sitting drinking a beer. I said to myself I just want to be sitting there next to that guy drinking a cold beer. It was dark and the water was choppy so I kept going. I lost sight of the pilot pretty quickly. When I got out of the water I hiked up to a relay station on top of a mountain. The guy couldn’t believe it – he thought I was the Creature from the Black Lagoon. The pilot ended up on a beach quite a bit north from me and he survived, too. But I don’t recall any great spiritual reckoning with it all.’

The irony is that the crash probably saved his life – instead of shipping out to Korea with his unit, he was ordered to stay behind while there was an investigation. ‘It left me haunted for a while and a little hollow. My company went on to Korea and it suffered heavy casualties. Fate pulls you in different directions. I was all ready to go but then things took a different turn and I had a different life. I’m a fatalist that way.’

[…]

On screen, he has always been the definition of rugged masculinity, and this strong character was forged when he was a boy, growing up in various locations around California in Depression-era America with sister Jean. 

‘It was tough but my sister and I didn’t know any different – we were kids. It was only when we got older and we watched our parents struggle from job to job – we would be sent to live with our grandmother when they were on the road trying to find work – that we realised how hard it was. It was a different time and they had strong values.

‘My father taught me to be hard-working, and that has stayed with me all my life. He and my mother were my role models. He was a confident man as far as his gender was concerned, and so was she. I grew up with the two genders firmly in place – a mother who was clearly defined and a father who could be tough when he had to be but who also had the confidence to be gentle.

‘He always taught us respect, and it was a time when your father would teach you about the difference between the sexes. I know it’s an old Boy Scout cliché about helping an old lady across the street, but I didn’t feel any weakness about being respectful to women. I never thought that wasn’t masculine.

‘Nowadays you look at guys and they’ve got to act tough. I never felt I needed to do that. I remember once meeting (world heavyweight boxing champion) Rocky Marciano and he was the toughest guy in the room – not just a great boxer but a roughhouse fighter. He shook hands with me and it was like shaking hands with a jelly. He didn’t try and break your knuckles because he didn’t need to show me he was the great Rocky Marciano, he was just another guy. I thought, “That’s true masculinity.”’

[…]

[USA Politics&Econmy]

Eastwood may be a conservative with a small ‘c’ but his politics are not so easily defined. 

‘My dad was fiscally conservative and I was influenced by that. He didn’t believe in spending more than you had because it gets you into trouble. But he was also very understanding of other people’s feelings – religious or whatever – and letting people live the lives they wanted, so he was socially a liberal.

‘And I became more of a libertarian – let’s leave everybody alone, quit screwing with everybody and don’t over-regulate. It’s about giving people a chance to live by their own decisions. And today the liberals aren’t really liberal at all because they won’t leave people alone, and a lot of the conservatives have lost their way fiscally. That’s why the UK, America, Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Spain are all in a mess right now.’

He was opposed to the war in Iraq. 

‘I didn’t understand why we invaded, and I still don’t. It’s the same with Afghanistan. I want the troops from Great Britain and the U.S. to be successful, but by the same token Afghanistan has always been a screw-up. The Russians, who live right next door, couldn’t prevail there, so what are we doing?’

In the last U.S. election he voted for the Republican candidate John McCain rather than Barack Obama. 

‘The first time I voted I was in the army. It was during the Korean War and I voted Republican because it was Eisenhower and he was somewhat heroic to all of us from World War II. So I became a Republican, but I’ve supported Democrats at times, and I don’t necessarily adhere to one line. Sometimes parties make mistakes – they both have. And our parties are in terrible shape – these days we don’t know where the hell they are.

‘I voted for McCain, not because he was a Republican, but because he had been through war (in Vietnam) and I thought he might understand the war in Iraq better than somebody who hadn’t. I didn’t agree with him on a lot of stuff. 

'I loved the fact that Obama is multi-racial. I thought that was terrific, as my wife is the same racial make-up. But I felt he was a greenhorn, and it turned out he didn’t have experience in decision-making.’

[Being Carmel mayor]

Eastwood has first-hand experience of politics – he was elected mayor of his home town, Carmel, in 1986 and served for two years. 

‘I wanted to change the way people looked at public service in that particular town because I lived there. I saw what was happening with a bunch of old-time retirees who sat there, lording it over people and taking terrible advantage rather than being public servants, which is what they’re supposed to be. But I didn’t want to stand again – to do it twice would have been repetitive.’



Source: Daily Mail

Sep 01, 2012, 1:31pm  0 notes      

I think governments should use Kickstarter®

lalapaloser:

It might work best on the local level, but imagine if any kind of public works that governments wanted to carry out was left to local people to fund it as wanted. Some people want a road, they better fork over the cash. It’s a rough idea, but I’d like to see people paying for government actions as they want it, and not forcing everyone to pay for something that only benefits some people.

August 25, 2012, 6:27pm   3 notes
▸ 'Mini-jobs' don't work in Germany, and they won't work in Britain, Guardian

While admitting that the scheme is costly for the state due to the exemptions from income tax, those advocating the scheme argue that it has not replaced regular employment and that increased labour market flexibility (meaning lower unit wage costs) has been instrumental in promoting German international competitiveness since 2003.

Unsurprisingly, the view from trade unions and sympathetic researchers is much grimmer: a 2010 report by researchers from the University of Duisburg-Essen, for instance, provides empirical evidence to show that “mini-jobs” are a growing low-wage trap with little prospect of longer-term transition, even into low-skill employment. Splitting regular jobs into mini ones is becoming more common. And “mini-jobbers” tend to be paid considerably less than the equivalent standard hourly wage for a given activity, nothwithstanding Germany’s anti-discrimination laws that explicitly prohibit this.

[…]

The simple truth is that “mini-jobs” are not working in Germany, and neither will they in the UK: the current crisis, in Germany and the UK, is a crisis of confidence in future (sales) prospects. Wages are costs for employers, but they are also the income that buys their products. Low-wage policies have had their day and have failed to produce the promised outcomes. Employers now need markets, and workers need jobs that pay to make a decent living. The solution is obvious, and it doesn’t include “mini-jobs”.

Some argument in USA comes close to this ‘future’ issue but not like this. Thus logging.



Source: Guardian

Aug 21, 2012, 9:37am  2 notes      

courtenaybird:

Silicon Valley tech boom is inflating rents… by a lot 
San Francisco red-hot startup activity is not only inflating the commercial real estate market, but it is also having an impact on the residential rental market, data shows. Since January 2011, annual rents are up by $5000 but things are even worse down in the Peninsula. Some are blaming it on the IPO market, but I personally think it is more and more people moving to SF Bay Area, working for tech startups and thus putting pressure on the local real estate market. 

Note to self: Need to get hold of few different analysis/perspective on this. Esp if estate bubble in SF Bay Area is going to repeat itself - there is a need to attempt to extract few lessons, if possible. 

courtenaybird:

Silicon Valley tech boom is inflating rents… by a lot 

San Francisco red-hot startup activity is not only inflating the commercial real estate market, but it is also having an impact on the residential rental market, data shows. Since January 2011, annual rents are up by $5000 but things are even worse down in the Peninsula. Some are blaming it on the IPO market, but I personally think it is more and more people moving to SF Bay Area, working for tech startups and thus putting pressure on the local real estate market. 

Note to self: Need to get hold of few different analysis/perspective on this. Esp if estate bubble in SF Bay Area is going to repeat itself - there is a need to attempt to extract few lessons, if possible. 

▸ Hardheaded Socialism Makes Canada Richer Than U.S. - Stephen Marche, Bloomberg

The difference grows starker by the month: The Canadian system is working; the American system is not. And it’s not just Canadians who are noticing. As Iceland considers switching to a currency other than the krona, its leaders’ primary focus of interest is the loonie — the Canadian dollar.

As a study recently published in the New York University Law Review pointed out, national constitutions based on the American model are quickly disappearing. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in an interview on Egyptian television, admitted, “I would not look to the United States Constitution if I were drafting a constitution in the year 2012.” The natural replacement? The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, achieving the status of legal superstar as it reaches its 30th birthday.

Good politics do not account entirely for recent economic triumphs. Luck has played a major part. The Alberta tar sands — an environmental catastrophe in waiting — are the third-largest oil reserves in the world, and if America is too squeamish to buy our filthy energy, there’s always China. We also have softwood lumber, potash and other natural resources in abundance.

Policy has played a significant part as well, though. Both liberals and conservatives in the U.S. have tried to use the Canadian example to promote their arguments: The left says Canada shows the rewards of financial regulation and socialism, while the right likes to vaunt the brutal cuts made to Canadian social programs in the 1990s, which set the stage for economic recovery.

The truth is that both sides are right. Since the 1990s, Canada has pursued a hardheaded (even ruthless), fiscally conservative form of socialism. Its originator was Paul Martin, who was finance minister for most of the ’90s, and served a stint as prime minister from 2003 to 2006. Alone among finance ministers in the Group of Eight nations, he “resisted the siren call of deregulation,” in his words, and insisted that the banks tighten their loan-loss and reserve requirements. He also made a courageous decision not to allow Canadian banks to merge, even though their chief executives claimed they would never be globally competitive unless they did. The stability of Canadian banks and the concomitant stability in the housing market provide the clearest explanation for why Canadians are richer than Americans today.

Read More»



Source: bloomberg.com

Jul 19, 2012, 5:13pm  0 notes      

 
“The places in America that are already back that are doing really well, their places are working together. We’ve got a Republican mayor of San Diego coming to our conference who works with all the Democrats to make it the genome capital of America. We’ve got a Democratic mayor of Chicago who’s working with all the Republicans in banking and finance there to give America its first urban infrastructure bank, something that used to have bipartisan support in Washington.

So I really believe this is a big decision the American people have to make. And I— was hoping by going there I could clarify that decision. And I hope I did and I’m glad I did it.”

June 06, 2012, 2:34am  0 notes

 
“Gov. Romney — an approach that looks like the approach the Europeans are trying to get out of, which is austerity first, which drives up unemployment and interestingly enough drives the government deficit up.

And he says, let’s grow now and adopt a 10-year budget plan that drives the budget down. They’re saying, let’s have austerity now and adopt a 10-year budget plan which, according to all the independent analysis, would actually add a trillion or two dollars to the debt because of their big tax cuts. So I think he’s really just got to talk to the American people and trust them with the truth here.

This is a very complicated thing. If you go back 500 years, the average financial collapse takes five to 10 years to get over, to get back to full employment — full employment. If there’s a mortgage collapse, which we’ve had for the last couple of hundred years periodically, it’s closer to 10 years. What he[Obama]’s trying to do is to beat that. The American people are - they want things done the day before yesterday, so they don’t like to wait 10 years to do anything. And there’s too much misery out there. I would say he’s on track to beat that pretty quickly by quite a lot.

And America still has the world’s largest economy, still the biggest exporter and still has enormous strengths. We are younger than Europe and Japan. We’re going to be younger than China in 20 years. We’re the most diverse economy in the world. We’re importing manufacturing jobs again. We’re bringing them home. For the first time since the ’90s manufacturing is growing. And it looks like it’s going to continue for three to five years.

We’re going to be OK. This is the agonizing fits-and-starts phase. Assuming no collapse in Europe, we’re going to be OK. And the Europeans appear to be trying to put together a sensible response on the banking side and eurobonds to invest in infrastructure to grow the economy. So if that happens, I think he’ll be fine. I think he’ll get through it.”
Bill Clinton on PBS News Hour, June 6th 2012

June 06, 2012, 2:28am  0 notes

▸ [Egypt Presidential Election: re: Muslim Brotherhood] Al Ahram, Egypt

To add insult to injury, the decision by the powerful Salafist Nour Party – Egypt’s second largest party and one-time ally of the Brotherhood in parliament – to throw its support behind Abul-Fotouh all but spelled the end of Mursi’s presidential prospects.

A rising anti-Islamist sentiment seemed to be confirmed by a recent Gallup poll, which showed a sharp rise in the number of Egyptians who had voted for Islamists in parliamentary elections but who now express dismay with their performance in the People’s Assembly and, as a result, are less likely to vote for them in the presidential elections.

"The Brotherhood is definitely in a difficult position now because of the Islamist-led parliament’s failure to deal with the economy; allegations of vote-buying; and its manoeuvring to monopolise power," Mohamed Kadry Said, head of security studies at the Ahram Centre for Political and Strategic Studies, told Ahram Online.

Yet, despite poll results to the contrary, the recent last-minute success of the Brotherhood to mobilise hundreds of thousands of supporters in an impressive show of force for their candidate points to the fact that the 80-year-old Brotherhood will remain a powerful player in Egypt’s political future – especially given the absence of any viable leftist or liberal alternative.

So already Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamists left the impression among public that they cannot be trusted for economic situation?



Source: english.ahram.org.eg

May 22, 2012, 6:44pm  0 notes      

▸ [Facebook share already declined 20%] Prolonged Facebook Slide Could Hurt Calif Budget - ABC News

California’s budget could take a hit if Facebook’s stock price keeps sliding. Gov. Jerry Brown previously estimated the state would generate between $1.4 billion and $1.9 billion over the next 13 months from taxes related to sales of Facebook stock. The estimate was based on a price of $35 a share.

Facebook went public Friday at $38 a share but closed at $31 on Tuesday.

Caution. Everyone. 20% (tumbl). EEk. 

And - this means could further slide down. What kind of materials would put stop on it?  - and when is FB’s quater result release for the first time???



May 22, 2012, 5:09pm  0 notes      

▸ Has North Korea Now Crossed China, Too? - NYTimes - Rendezvous Blog

Mr. Lee’s Myanmar trip had particular resonance because it was the first by a South Korean leader since North Korean agents tried, but failed, to assassinate then-President Chun Doo-hwan in the Burmese capital in 1983. The North Koreans did kill 17 other South Koreans, including cabinet ministers, as well as four Burmese.

President Lee promised South Korean assistance if Myanmar ended its military cooperation with Pyongyang. “We want to tell North Korea that it must learn a lesson from Myanmar to cooperate with the international community and receive aid for development,” The Monitor quoted Kim Tae-hyo, South Korea’s senior presidential secretary for national security strategy, as saying.

But the North is famous for its stubbornness, and analysts doubt that message is getting across. The Pyongyang Times in recent days has heaped invective on Mr. Lee, calling him an “unblushing impostor” and “brazen-faced devil,” a “bastard of unclear nationality” and an “unworldly puppy daring to challenge a tiger,” an “eel born in a ditch, lunatic, sub-standard human,” in commentary here.

Meanwhile, Pyongyang is busy evading a United Nations ban on luxury goods prompted by its previous nuclear tests, Reuters reports. Tobacco, cosmetics, luxury cars, watches and computers are getting in, almost all through China, although a recent attempt to import expensive tap-dancing shoes from Italy, price at nearly $200 a pair, was foiled, the report said.

China does not consider the items, which are sought after by North Korea’s growing middle class, to be “luxury” goods, Reuters reported.

Reports talking about nuclear test might be imminent. This association between Myanmar/Burma and North Korea - made by the President of South Korea Lee Myung-bak - is (bit) interesting.



May 21, 2012, 4:54am  2 notes      

▸ [Radio audio] Oxytocin: The Moral Molecule, Leonard Lopate Show, WNYC

Paul Zak tells us about oxytocin, a chemical messenger that accounts for why some people are generous, trustworthy, and faithful and others aren’t.

His book The Moral Molecule: The Source of Love and Prosperity looks at decades of research on what oxytocin is and how it works.  

Bit simplistic. But - level of oxytocin, and then general level of trust held among the members of a society - and how that might be related with their economic performance.

Fairly linear. But very interesting :) I wish I had time to transcribe some really interesting parts of this show. 



Source: wnyc.org

May 14, 2012, 1:15pm  1 note      

roxygen:

I don’t love the way this is written, but it covers relevant points. Emphasis mine. 
Rue 20 / MEO
Morocco’s new  government, led by Prime Minister Abdelilah Benkirane, is facing dire economic times, caught between rising prices, slowing growth, and a harsh drought that has badly affected farming.
The nation’s 33 million people also face high unemployment, a problem that has fanned social unrest, such as recent rioting in the northeastern town of Taza.
[…]
France and Spain, whose economies are stagnating amid a spiralling debt crisis in the eurozone, are Morocco’s two main trade partners.
Attracting foreign investment is also proving a challenge with both the EU and Gulf countries reducing exposure because of global economic uncertainty.
Morocco’s public deficit last year reached 6.0 percent of gross domestic product, a record brought on in part by growing subsidies, notably on food, as the government sought to defuse a growing protest movement inspired by the Arab Spring.
[…]
“The government has been caught out by the size of the problem. Its euphoric (electoral) campaign gave rise to widespread expectations. Now, they have to pay the price,” economist Driss Benali said.
The government is finding it has little room for manoeuvre.
The rise in oil prices has severely hit the country’s trade balance which in February was 3.0 billion euros ($4.0 billion) in the red, a figure nearly 30 percent worse than that registered in February 2011.
And the import of cereals could more than double this year compared to last because of a bad drought that has hit farming, according to a recent government report.
Morocco might have to import more wheat in 2012-13 than ever before in half a century, the US Department of Agriculture said on March 20.
Wheat imports of 3.2 million tonnes in 2011-12 could rise to 5.0 million tonnes over the coming year.
Agriculture accounts for about 17 percent of Morocco’s gross domestic product, and employs nearly 40 percent the population, according to official statistics.
To dampen growing protests last year, the state nearly doubled its spending on subsidies with these accounting now for nearly 20 percent of the government’s budget.
And the drought has led to higher food prices, with oil prices expected soon to follow suit.
Morocco has no oil, but is the world’s main phosphate producer. Tourism and money transfers from Moroccans abroad account for the two other high foreign currency earners.
In a bid to boost the economy, the central bank has just announced an 0.25 point drop in its base rate to 3.0 percent.
“The government has boosted expectations by buying social peace with some subsidies here, some pay increases there, and some broken promises. The cost is high,” Ben Ali said.

It’s missing last 3 paragraphs - which kind of crucial to characterize:

"It’s an economic cycle crisis. While waiting for it to ease, the government must do more to fight corruption and the rentier economy," he added.
Morocco came in a lowly 85th place in Transparency International’s annual global ranking of corruption in 2010, behind China, Brazil and Saudi Arabia.
Justice Minister Mustafa Ramid said this week that more than 4,000 cases of corruption came before Morocco’s courts last year.
http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/3/12/38202/Business/Economy/Moroccos-Islamist-government-faces-harsh-economic-.aspx


So 
There is structural vulnerability
agri sector totally depends on rain fall
no job prospect for youth 
corruption 
But then - tackling corruption - but clearly that’s really really cultural. You can never change that overnight (if at all, if you can change it). And even deposing monarchy and replacing it with Al-Adl or Feb 20 types etc won’t really change that (Will only make it worse economically. Al Adl might tout some serene visions, but actually creating human resources and changing culture at all level of the society is not probably something they can achieve - … ) 
So let’s say next few years might be bad turn (cyclic downturn) - but 
Oil is from Saudi/GCC (usually - ‘patron’ prefers to do work on some payment or money back arrangement than get the customer in real crisis (Islamist Al ADL upheaval) - hope some price or aid deal will be worked out
Also, grain imports are from France - and Canada? etc. French’s part is not small. That could have some arrangement. 
And then PJD, monarchy/makhzen, and ADL - how their alliance/loyalty and rivalry politics would work out - 
EU really really doesn’t want Morocco to harbor constant social unrest and power vacuum. (Can’t take it now. No way.) USA also sees Morocco as key regional ally. 
I think probably monarchy/makhzen knows that too. 
And in today’s world - no one ever is really that saintly free from corruption. (I still don’t know in what way Transparency International’s data is really reliable.) 
Then 

Morocco reports higher than expected grain harvest (*Slightly higher) 

Then USA agri business is - (like vulture) 


US grains exporters are stepping up efforts to win back share of the Moroccan market, whose import needs are expected to soar this year thanks to “intensified supply pressures” caused by drought.
The US Grains Council has “turned its attention to initiatives to recapture the US share of the Morocco market” for coarse grain imports, after the North African country missed out on rains which have improved crop conditions in countries further north, in  western Europe.
"Dry conditions have continued throughout most of April," Cary Sifferath, regional director for the council, which promotes US grain exports. […]




"While Morocco is a market in which the US has recently faced growing competition, the extended drought is creating intensified supply pressures and thus opportunities for US exports," Mr Sifferath said.
The USGC will be “working with grain procurement authorities to help them source their additional feed needs from the US”.
Morocco has estimated its cereals harvest tumbling to 4.8m tonnes this year, from 8.4m tonnes in 2011, because of the lack of moisture.
http://www.agrimoney.com/news/us-boosts-drive-to-revive-grain-exports-to-morocco—4465.html


… does this mean USA will care about Monarchy’s stability and social stability - or won’t care and just pull the money out as much as possible from Morocco and will not care at all. 
I don’t know. 

roxygen:

I don’t love the way this is written, but it covers relevant points. Emphasis mine. 

Rue 20 / MEO

Morocco’s new  government, led by Prime Minister Abdelilah Benkirane, is facing dire economic times, caught between rising prices, slowing growth, and a harsh drought that has badly affected farming.

The nation’s 33 million people also face high unemployment, a problem that has fanned social unrest, such as recent rioting in the northeastern town of Taza.

[…]

France and Spain, whose economies are stagnating amid a spiralling debt crisis in the eurozone, are Morocco’s two main trade partners.

Attracting foreign investment is also proving a challenge with both the EU and Gulf countries reducing exposure because of global economic uncertainty.

Morocco’s public deficit last year reached 6.0 percent of gross domestic product, a record brought on in part by growing subsidies, notably on food, as the government sought to defuse a growing protest movement inspired by the Arab Spring.

[…]

“The government has been caught out by the size of the problem. Its euphoric (electoral) campaign gave rise to widespread expectations. Now, they have to pay the price,” economist Driss Benali said.

The government is finding it has little room for manoeuvre.

The rise in oil prices has severely hit the country’s trade balance which in February was 3.0 billion euros ($4.0 billion) in the red, a figure nearly 30 percent worse than that registered in February 2011.

And the import of cereals could more than double this year compared to last because of a bad drought that has hit farming, according to a recent government report.

Morocco might have to import more wheat in 2012-13 than ever before in half a century, the US Department of Agriculture said on March 20.

Wheat imports of 3.2 million tonnes in 2011-12 could rise to 5.0 million tonnes over the coming year.

Agriculture accounts for about 17 percent of Morocco’s gross domestic product, and employs nearly 40 percent the population, according to official statistics.

To dampen growing protests last year, the state nearly doubled its spending on subsidies with these accounting now for nearly 20 percent of the government’s budget.

And the drought has led to higher food prices, with oil prices expected soon to follow suit.

Morocco has no oil, but is the world’s main phosphate producer. Tourism and money transfers from Moroccans abroad account for the two other high foreign currency earners.

In a bid to boost the economy, the central bank has just announced an 0.25 point drop in its base rate to 3.0 percent.

“The government has boosted expectations by buying social peace with some subsidies here, some pay increases there, and some broken promises. The cost is high,” Ben Ali said.

It’s missing last 3 paragraphs - which kind of crucial to characterize:

"It’s an economic cycle crisis. While waiting for it to ease, the government must do more to fight corruption and the rentier economy," he added.

Morocco came in a lowly 85th place in Transparency International’s annual global ranking of corruption in 2010, behind China, Brazil and Saudi Arabia.

Justice Minister Mustafa Ramid said this week that more than 4,000 cases of corruption came before Morocco’s courts last year.

http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/3/12/38202/Business/Economy/Moroccos-Islamist-government-faces-harsh-economic-.aspx

So 

There is structural vulnerability

  • agri sector totally depends on rain fall
  • no job prospect for youth 
  • corruption 

But then - tackling corruption - but clearly that’s really really cultural. You can never change that overnight (if at all, if you can change it). And even deposing monarchy and replacing it with Al-Adl or Feb 20 types etc won’t really change that (Will only make it worse economically. Al Adl might tout some serene visions, but actually creating human resources and changing culture at all level of the society is not probably something they can achieve - … ) 

So let’s say next few years might be bad turn (cyclic downturn) - but 

  • Oil is from Saudi/GCC (usually - ‘patron’ prefers to do work on some payment or money back arrangement than get the customer in real crisis (Islamist Al ADL upheaval) - hope some price or aid deal will be worked out
  • Also, grain imports are from France - and Canada? etc. French’s part is not small. That could have some arrangement. 

And then PJD, monarchy/makhzen, and ADL - how their alliance/loyalty and rivalry politics would work out - 

EU really really doesn’t want Morocco to harbor constant social unrest and power vacuum. (Can’t take it now. No way.) USA also sees Morocco as key regional ally. 

I think probably monarchy/makhzen knows that too. 

And in today’s world - no one ever is really that saintly free from corruption. (I still don’t know in what way Transparency International’s data is really reliable.) 

Then 

Morocco reports higher than expected grain harvest (*Slightly higher) 

Then USA agri business is - (like vulture) 

US grains exporters are stepping up efforts to win back share of the Moroccan market, whose import needs are expected to soar this year thanks to “intensified supply pressures” caused by drought.

The US Grains Council has “turned its attention to initiatives to recapture the US share of the Morocco market” for coarse grain imports, after the North African country missed out on rains which have improved crop conditions in countries further north, in  western Europe.

"Dry conditions have continued throughout most of April," Cary Sifferath, regional director for the council, which promotes US grain exports. […]

"While Morocco is a market in which the US has recently faced growing competition, the extended drought is creating intensified supply pressures and thus opportunities for US exports," Mr Sifferath said.

The USGC will be “working with grain procurement authorities to help them source their additional feed needs from the US”.

Morocco has estimated its cereals harvest tumbling to 4.8m tonnes this year, from 8.4m tonnes in 2011, because of the lack of moisture.

http://www.agrimoney.com/news/us-boosts-drive-to-revive-grain-exports-to-morocco—4465.html

… does this mean USA will care about Monarchy’s stability and social stability - or won’t care and just pull the money out as much as possible from Morocco and will not care at all. 

I don’t know.